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NPR

'Breaking Bad' Writers: 'This Is It; There's No More'

The AMC show about a high school chemistry teacher turned meth dealer ended its fifth and final season on Sunday. Writers Peter Gould and Thomas Schnauz say there was "absolute sadness" in the writers' room as they put the last plot points into place.
NPR

Rick Najera: A Latino In Hollywood Is 'Almost White'

Rick Najera's name may not sound familiar, but his work is famous in Hollywood. Host Michel Martin talks with the funnyman about his career and his book Almost White: Forced Confessions of A Latino in Hollywood.
NPR

Can Walter White Give Us Closure?

The saga of the high school chemistry teacher turned meth kingpin comes to an end tonight. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Time magazine TV and pop culture columnist James Poniewozik about how AMC's award-winning series Breaking Bad might finish.
NPR

The Most Shocking Moments Are True In 'Masters Of Sex'

Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan star as famous sexologists Masters and Johnson in the new TV series, Masters of Sex. They tell NPR's Rachel Martin that they had to get comfortable sitting around naked together because of all the sex scenes — and that some of the most shocking moments were things that really happened.
WAMU 88.5

Film Industry Gives Virginia Economic Boost

Virginia's film industry is making millions of dollars for the state while employing residents.

NPR

The Competing Interests Behind Smokey Bear And The Crying Indian

The company behind iconic public service campaigns like Smokey Bear and McGruff the Crime Dog has been around since the 1940s. But how much is really known about the Ad Council? Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks to author Wendy Melillo about her book How McGruff and the Crying Indian Changed America.
NPR

Point Of View: How So Many Rooted For 'Breaking Bad's' Walter White

How did the creators of Breaking Bad get millions of fans to stick by a meth-cooking drug lord season after season? The crafty use of an old editing technique in the pilot let us see the world through Walt's eyes, a film psychologist says, making it easier to excuse his immoral choices later on.
NPR

'Masters Of Sex' Get Unmasterful Treatment On Showtime

The series follows the stories of science pioneers William Masters and Virginia Johnson, who helped bring sexuality into the light. Critic John Powers says it clearly aspires to be "the Mad Men of sex" -- but falls short in both its eye for detail and its retrograde portrayals of sex.
NPR

Lots Of New TV Shows Air This Fall But Not Many Are Original

Robert Siegel talks with Eric Deggans, outgoing TV and media critic for The Tampa Bay Times and incoming TV critic for NPR, about the fall television season. Deggans says a lot of the shows may be new, but they're not entirely original.
NPR

'Trophy Wife' Is More Than Just A Pretty Face On ABC

The show's self-professed feminist creators wanted to take on a type generally scorned in popular culture. It's a favorite among critics, but one reviewer worries it will suffer from the Cougar Town effect — good show, terrible name.

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