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Katey Sagal, Holding Court On 'Sons Of Anarchy'

The actress plays Gemma, the fierce matriarch of the biker gang in the FX series. She's best-known for playing the acerbic Peg Bundy on the long-running show Married With Children.
NPR

Impersonating The President: From Will Rogers To Obama's 'Anger Translator'

Elizabeth Blair finds that presidential impersonations came and went and then came back again, but it's not always easy to find just the right angle on a sitting president — or a challenger.
NPR

D.L. Hughley: Tough Words On Politics And Women

Actor and comedian D.L. Hughley has never shied away from controversy, offering his tough, unapologetic opinions on race, money, politics and even his family. Hughley joins host Michel Martin share his critique of American leaders and to talk about his new book. Advisory: This conversation may not be comfortable for all listeners.
NPR

Watching TV Online Often Exposes Slow Bandwidth

There are more ways than ever to watch TV programs on the Internet, from Netflix and Amazon to Hulu. But many viewers discover that watching TV on the Web can be frustrating, as their favorite show might suddenly stop and stutter, the victim of a lack of bandwidth.
NPR

TV Show Times Cut To Make Way For Political Ads

Audie Cornish talks to Jon Ralston, host of the Nevada TV show Ralston Reports. He talks about the unprecedented number of political ads airing in Nevada this year. Many shows, including his, have been shortened to create more time for ads to run.
NPR

So Many Screens, And So Little Time To Watch

While supersized TV screens have a proud place in many American homes, our viewing habits are changing. Even as DVRs and online services alter the meaning of "TV," phones, tablets and game devices crowd pockets and coffee tables, offering new chances to watch video.
NPR

The TV Screen's Evolution, From 1880 To The Present

Despite its status as a device that defines the modern age, the television has its roots in the 19th century, when radio pioneers suspected they could also transmit images. Even the word "television," combining Greek and Latin roots to mean "far-sight," stems from the 1900 world's fair.

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