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NPR

Will Future Historians Consider These Days The Digital Dark Ages?

We are awash in a sea of information, but how to historians sift through the mountain of data? In the future, computer programs will be unreadable, and therefore worthless, to historians.
NPR

Forgot Something Again? It's Probably Just Normal Aging

Around age 50, people may begin to forget things. This can be scary. But there are clear differences between the onset of dementia and totally normal, age-related lapses in memory.
NPR

Egypt Cracks Down On Free Facebook Service

Egypt has shut down a free Facebook service called Free Basics. The government says it's a licensing issue, but critics say the Egyptian government is stifling freedom of expression.
NPR

What Happens When You Try To Date Offline

Lisa Bonos recently performed an experiment: She dated for three months without the help of her familiar dating apps.
NPR

For Internet To Go, Check The Library

Little Spring Hill, Tennessee stands among the country's biggest cities at the new frontier of library services. Available for check-out here are Wi-Fi hotspots, leased to patrons for free.
NPR

An Artistic Time Capsule Prepares To Hitch A Ride To The Moon

When a company named Astrobotic launches a lunar rover in 2017, the MoonArk will be aboard. It's a lightweight, sturdy "portrait of humanity," carrying the work of more than 200 artists and designers.
NPR

Selfies In 2015: A Woman Thing?

In 2015, selfie love did not die. And one stereotype held strong: that the art form appears to be dominated by women. But don't count out the men just yet.
NPR

Composers Learn To Make A Living WIth 'Invisible' Music

Berklee College of Music boasts a long list of Grammy Award winners among its alumni. But now, Berklee is filling classes with students making music for podcasts, video games and commercials.
NPR

You've Heard Of The Nae Nae. But What About Na Goore?

Viral videos come from every corner of the planet. Here's a look at some of the year's most popular YouTube videos from the developing world.
NPR

World's Largest Meatpacking Company Tests Out Robot Butchers

Slaughterhouses and meatpacking plants throughout the country employ a lot of people. About a quarter of a million Americans prepare the beef, pork and chicken that ends up on dinner tables. But some of those jobs could eventually be replaced by robots. The world's largest meatpacking company is looking at ways to automate the art of butchery.

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