Technology | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Technology

RSS Feed
NPR

Music Magazine Spins Reviews To Twitter

SPIN Magazine is hoping to review 1,500 albums and mixtapes exclusively in 140-character tweets on the @SPINReviews Twitter feed in 2012. The music magazine recently abandoned their 80-word reviews for the new Twitter format, which critics think is killing the art of the music review.
NPR

Wael Ghonim: Creating A 'Revolution 2.0' In Egypt

The protests that led to the Egyptian revolution last year were organized in part by Wael Ghonim, who used an anonymous Facebook page to coordinate the demonstrations. In his new book, Ghonim explains how social media helped transform his country.
NPR

Amazon Expands Streaming With Viacom Deal

Amazon announced Wednesday that it will expand the selection on its streaming service through a new deal with Viacom. Included in the deal are Paramount movies, as well as shows from Comedy Central, Nickelodeon, MTV and more. This deal isn't exclusive, in that much of the material is on other streaming services already such as Hulu and Netflix.
NPR

Redefining The Grieving Process In The Digital Age

After a loved one dies, it's becoming more common to offer and receive condolences through a Facebook post or an email. New York Times contributor Bruce Feiler discusses the new customs that are evolving to guide the grieving process in the digital age.
NPR

Facebook: Lots Of Friends, But Stock Offering Has Risks

Roughly half of Facebook's users check in on smartphones and other mobile devices every month, but so far the company isn't making money on mobile. That's one of the potential pitfalls for the company as it prepares to sell its stock to the public.
NPR

A Pulpit For The Masses: YouTube, Christians Click

Many have turned to YouTube to express their views about the message of Jesus. At least one has reached biblical proportions. With more than 18 million views, "Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus" has become a sensation.
NPR

Chinese Labor Practices Sour Apple Consumers

Apple products' manufacturers have been accused of exposing workers to toxic chemicals, hiring the underage, and improperly disposing of waste. Host Michel Martin talks with C-Net Editor Rafe Needleman about whether it's possible to make an ethical smartphone.

Pages