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NPR

Test Driving The Nissan Leaf

Robert Siegel test drives the Leaf, Nissan's electric plug-in vehicle, with Carlos Ghosn, chief executive officer of Nissan and Renault.
NPR

Using Battelle Technology And Don't Know It?

Battelle isn't exactly a household name but the Ohio nonprofit is responsible for everyday items like the Xerox copy, compact discs and even bar codes. Those are the inventions Battelle publicly takes credit for. There are countless others, but the Columbus-based organization stays under the radar because it develops these products for large corporations confidentially. This report is from the Midwest reporting project Changing Gears.
NPR

Timeline: The 100-Year History Of The Electric Car

The electric car was just as popular as its gasoline counterpart when it first went into production around the turn of the 20th century. But with the advent of highways, people wanted to go farther than their battery life allowed. Today's electric cars face similar challenges.
NPR

Can Electric Cars Help Automakers Reach 55 MPG?

Fuel-economy standards are set to double by 2025. Electric cars could help reach that goal, but consumers just aren't buying them on a large scale. Beloved by niche markets, the cars face similar challenges as when they first appeared over 100 years ago: a higher price than gas cars and concerns over battery life.
NPR

How One Man Played 'Moneyball' With 'Jeopardy!'

Roger Craig has wanted to be on Jeopardy! since he was 12 years old. When he finally got his shot, he knew he had to make it count. So he built a computer model to mine Jeopardy! for patterns. He says the most exciting part wasn't the money — it was that his system worked.
NPR

The U.S. Army? There's An App For That

The U.S. Army is working to use smartphones on the battlefield as a way to keep soldiers connected and give them better tools. Specialist Nicholas Johnson has designed a group of applications meant to help troops on the ground. Host Audie Cornish has more.
NPR

Cow Clicker Founder: If You Can't Ruin It, Destroy It

Zynga, the company behind popular Facebook games such as Farmville and Cityville, is expected to have its initial public offering before the end of the year. Zynga is a phenomenon. More than 200 million people play its games each month. One person who doesn't feel Zynga's success is cause for celebration is video game designer Ian Bogost. Bogost thinks Zynga's games are mindless, designed to suck money out of players' pockets. To make his point he created a parody game of his own. As On the Media's P.J. Vogt reports, what Bogost didn't expect is that his satire would become one of the most popular games he's ever made.

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