Technology | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Technology

RSS Feed
NPR

Who — If Anyone — Should Control The Internet?

For the first time, groups can apply for Internet addresses with their own suffixes. The one U.S.-created organization empowered to regulate the global Internet planned this expansion, which highlights the debate over whether another entity, such as the U.N., should take over Internet governance.
NPR

A War To Watch: YouTube Takes On Television

YouTube's future success depends on increasing the amount of time people spend watching videos on the site. The Google-owned website plans to roll out more than 100 new, professionally produced channels in a push to draw viewers away from television, and onto the Web.
NPR

Critics See 'Disaster' In Expansion Of Domain Names

The agency that governs domain categories like .org and .com is forging ahead with plans to sell new names despite some vocal opposition from regulators. For a registration fee of $185,000, applicants could register a suffix like .music or .Nabisco. But that could lead to problems, opponents say.
NPR

Google Tweaks Search To Boost Google+, And Rivals Get Angry

Social media has become a huge part of how people experience the web. So it's not surprising that Google's move to integrate "personal results" into its search results — drawing from the Google+ community — wasn't praised by the folks who run rival social networks.
WAMU 88.5

GWU Professor's Laser Technology Recognized

A laser used to analyze biological samples, the work of a George Washington University professor, was recognized by The Scientist magazine as one of the top 10 innovations of 2011.

NPR

Army Scraps Most Of The JTRS Program

The Army has spent billions of dollars in the past 15 years on an ambitious program to develop a universal radio. It was called the Joint Tactical Radio System, or "JTRS." But now the Army has scrapped most of that program. Melissa Block talks to military writer David Axe about its failure.
NPR

Can Two Smartphone Also-Rans Rescue Each Other?

Both Nokia and Microsoft have been left behind in the race to capture a piece of the fast-growing smartphone pie. Now Nokia, with Microsoft's help, is trying to force its way back into the North American smartphone market, announcing a new 4G phone for AT&T.

Pages