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'Pinterest' Wades In Murky Copyright Waters

The popular website Pinterest allows millions of users to "pin" digital images and share virtual bulletin boards. But it's raising suspicions about potential copyright infringement. Audie Cornish talks to attorney Jonathan Pink — who heads the Internet and New Media Team at the law firm Bryan Cave — about who owns what online.

NPR

Cybersecurity Bill: Vital Need Or Just More Rules?

The prospect of a paralyzing cyberattack has convinced U.S. security officials and lawmakers that a new law may be needed to promote improved cyberdefenses at critical facilities. Progress on that legislation, however, has been slowed by a debate over whether new cybersecurity measures should be mandated or merely encouraged.
NPR

A Job At What Cost? When Employers Log In To Dig In

Robert Collins says he felt "violated" when the Maryland Department of Corrections asked to log in to his Facebook account during a job interview. He's now pushing back, working with lawmakers to bar employers from asking such a privacy-invading question.
NPR

Resume, Cover Letter And Your Facebook Password?

At your next job interview you might need to hand in more than a resume and references. More employers are requiring applicants to submit their Facebook password as part of the application process. States like Illinois and Maryland are enacting legislation to ban the practice. Robert Siegel talks with Robert Collins, who had to hand over his Facebook user name and password when applying for a job with the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
NPR

Social Media Put Fla. Case In National Spotlight

Scores of people signed online petitions to Attorney General Eric Holder, asking the Justice Department to investigate the killing of Florida teen Trayvon Martin by a neighborhood watch volunteer. The case shows the power of social networking to quickly mobilize advocates in sometimes volatile situations.
NPR

FBI Still Struggling With Supreme Court's GPS Ruling

The Supreme Court recently said police overstepped their legal authority by planting a GPS tracker on the car of a suspected drug dealer without a search warrant. The decision set off alarm bells at the FBI, where officials are trying to determine whether they need to change the way they work.
NPR

Paying Dividend Gives More Investors A Bite Of Apple

Apple announced Monday that for the first time since the mid-1990s the company will start paying a dividend. At the end of 2011, Apple had almost $100 billion in cash burning a hole it its pocket, and investors have been clamoring for the company to start sharing the wealth.
NPR

Apple's Dividend Underwhelms Some

Robert Siegel speaks to Roben Farzad, a senior writer at BusinessWeek, about the implications of Apple's decision to pay dividends.

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