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NPR

Self-Tracking: Becoming Your Own Big Brother

How was your workout? Did you sleep well? How far are you in that book? These questions used to be general queries. New apps and gadgets allow us to keep track of every minute detail of our daily movements and activities — a practice known as self-tracking.
NPR

Does Social Media Encourage Violent Teen Behavior?

The recent rape allegations in Steubenville, Ohio raised concerns among parents about whether social media is encouraging bad and sometimes violent teen behavior. Host Michel Martin explores new media and teens' decisions about risk with a panel of parents.
WAMU 88.5

Food Technology And How It Shaped The Western Palate

Kojo and a food historian look back at how food processors have influenced both our palates and our preference for what we eat, and find out how the industry is changing to meet modern taste and dietary demands.

NPR

These Are The Tweets That Will Get A Doctor In Trouble

The boards that license and discipline doctors are watching what they post online. Guaranteed cancer cures and photos of drunken debauchery are definite no-nos. A picture of a doctor holding a drink at an office party might raise an eyebrow but probably wouldn't trigger an investigation.
NPR

U.S. Car Makers Focus On Autonomy, Fuel Economy

Sonari Glinton talks to Audie Cornish about the technology to be introduced at the North American International Auto Show and looks at the most important auto-related innovations to come out of the recent Consumer Electronics Show. The highlights include research in electronic vehicles, advanced manufacturing that allows one assembly line to make dozens of cars, and increasing synergy between Detroit and Silicon Valley.
NPR

Internet Activist Memorialized As Leader Of 'Free Culture' Movement

The death of Aaron Swartz has intensified a debate over access to information on the Internet. Swartz was a computer prodigy and activist who committed suicide on Friday. He was only 26, but he had long ago become a leader of the Free Culture movement, which believed online information should be accessible to everyone. Audie Cornish talks about the movement with a reporter who has covered it, Declan McCullagh, chief political correspondent with CNET.
WAMU 88.5

Drones And Their Use In Counterterrorism

U.S. drone strikes have killed several high-level al-Qaida operatives, but critics argue the civilian toll is too high and there is too little transparency. The changing way we fight war.

NPR

Java Security Flaw Is Repaired; Experts Still Recommend Disabling It

Days after the Department of Homeland Security said computer users should remove the latest versions of its Java software, Oracle Corp. says it has fixed the flaw. But U.S. security experts call another security vulnerability "likely."

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