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Tell the World Your Big Idea With NPR's 'What's Your Big Idea?' Video Contest

Do you have a good idea? Something that could change the world? NPR wants to know. Our new "What's Your Big Idea?" video contest will showcase the big ideas of people ages 13 to 25. It's all part of our exploration of the process of innovation and invention. So, what's your big idea?
WAMU 88.5

DNS Changer: Cyber Criminals, Internet Access And The FBI

Some 60,000 Americans could have discovered Monday they did not have Internet service. The cause: malicious code created last fall by cyber criminals. What the FBI did and didn't do about it -- and what you can do if your computer is infected.

WAMU 88.5

Traffic Camera Technology

Traffic cameras have polarized communities. But new high tech systems may be changing our driving habits. Tech Tuesday explores how automated camera systems work.

NPR

New Projects Help 3-D Printing Materialize

Until now, 3-D printers have been something of a novelty. The computer-controlled machines create three-dimensional objects from a variety of materials. Now, they are being discovered by everyday consumers. Jon Kalish reports.
NPR

Your Love Letters To Pie Came In Droves

The outpouring of responses we received — in comments and over email and Twitter — to Pie Week speaks to just how making and eating pie brings us together.
NPR

Yahoo, Facebook Reportedly In Ad Deal

The deal would involve swapping advertising and ends a contentious patent dispute launched by Yahoo three months ago.
WAMU 88.5

Tax Breaks For Tech In The District

The District is offering a $32.5 million tax deal to keep LivingSocial local, and while critics say it's a giveaway, others say it's key to nurturing a nascent tech industry.

NPR

U.N. Human Rights Council Backs Internet Freedom

The main human rights body of the United Nations is backing a landmark resolution that states people have a right to freedom of expression on the Internet. The resolution got nearly universal support — even from countries that censor the Internet.

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