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NPR

'Flame' Malware Designed For Spying, Not 'Cyber War'

The latest entrant in the arsenal of advanced cyber packages deployed by governments or corporations for use against their adversaries is a piece of malicious software dubbed "Flame." The malware contains a wide variety of espionage tools, including a feature that activates the internal microphone in personal computers and enables the user to monitor a target's conversation. In terms of sophistication, Flame has been compared to the Stuxnet worm, which can physically destroy industrial equipment. But experts say Flame is not a cyber weapon and its emergence as another espionage tool is not without precedent.
NPR

'Flame' Malware Said To Be Targeting Iran: Huge Deal Or Huge Hype?

Word from the antivirus experts at Kaspersky Lab that "we've found what might be the most sophisticated cyber weapon yet unleashed," and that this Flame spyware is targeting Iran and some places in the Middle East, is getting lots of attention.
NPR

Libraries Grapple With The Downside Of E-Books

Digital books are the fastest growing area of publishing. Libraries are seeing a surge in demand for e-book titles as well, but there's a downside. Most major publishers won't allow libraries to lend their titles, while others impose restrictions or charge double or triple the print price.
NPR

How Firms Can Recover From High-Tech Stumbles

Bloomberg News technology columnist Rich Jaroslovsky talks to David Greene about what happens when good gadgets go bad. Whether it's failed hardware or software, how a company handles a botched release has become increasingly important.
NPR

As Headphones Invade The Office, Are We Lonelier?

Headphones have become common in the workplace, allowing people to tune out their co-workers. But in many cases, those same co-workers are still communicating — online. Critics say technology is letting us hide from one another, but in one case study workers who posted on an internal company blog actually increased productivity.
NPR

Long Before The Internet, The Linotype Sped Up The News

In 1886, Ottmar Mergenthaler invented a machine that could create an entire line of type at once. It was called the linotype and it revolutionized the way we communicate.

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