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NPR

Mug Shot Websites Charge When You're Charged, For Now

If you've been arrested in the last 10 years, there's a good chance your arrest photo ended up on any number of websites. You'll have to pay to make them take it down, but one lawyer aims to make the websites pay instead.
NPR

With Growth Of 'Hacker Scouting,' More Kids Learn To Tinker

With the rise of the do-it-yourself movement, more groups are springing up to encourage kids to link crafts and science. Modeled on more traditional Scouting groups, kids and their parents meet up in tool-filled "hacker spaces" to build electronics and get creative.
NPR

'Gangnam Style' And Other Best Memes Of 2012 Say Something About Us

The things that catch on and get copied or parodied across the Web often catch fire because they let people share themselves in unique ways, say the trend trackers at Know Your Meme.
NPR

Future Fibers May Be Spun From Slime

The hagfish or "slime eel" shoots out slime containing silk-like fibers of remarkable strength. Douglas Fudge, a biologist at the University of Guelph, says it could be a good substitute for today's synthetic fibers--it's 10 times stronger than nylon, for example--and bacteria can be trained to make it.
NPR

Instagram Reverts To Original Ad Terms After Uproar

The company released plans for updates to its terms of service and privacy policy earlier this week, only to face a barrage of criticism. One of the main concerns was over advertisers' rights to users' photos.
NPR

From Shoes To M&M's, Custom-Made Products Take Off Online

The ability to customize products began with computers more than a decade ago. Now, you can create your own T-shirts, jeans, custom-blend cosmetics and candy. Even luxury brands like Burberry, Prada and Louis Vuitton now let customers design their own looks.
NPR

FAA Pressured To Give E-Readers A Pass During Takeoff, Landing

Passengers can currently use devices such as Kindles, iPads and Nooks while in flight, but not during takeoffs and landings. The FAA says it is studying the matter, but the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission and a U.S. senator say it's time to act.

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