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Oakland Raiders' Al Davis 'True Legend' Of The Game

Longtime Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis, whose maverick style had a huge impact on professional football, has died. The 82-year-old saw his team win three Super Bowls. His independent streak was both admired and excoriated, but stubbornness in his later years was blamed for the team's struggles. NPR's Allison Keyes has this remembrance.
NPR

Oakland Raiders Hall Of Famer Al Davis Dies

Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis died today at age 82. Davis was a legend in the football world and was largely responsible for building the Raiders into a three-time Super Bowl champion. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Robert Smith talks to sportswriter Peter Richmond, author of the book Badasses: The Legend of Snake, Foo, Dr. Death, and John Madden's Oakland Raiders.
NPR

Marathon Gets Tornado-Hit Town Back On Its Feet

Runners across the country are converging in Joplin, Mo., for the city's second annual marathon on Sunday. Last spring's tornado devastated the town, and locals hope the race helps them carry on. Jacob Fenston of member station KBIA reports.
NPR

Sports From 'The Onion': A New Book Explores 'The Ecstasy Of Defeat'

The Onion is best-known for its straightforward news coverage, but it also has a thriving sports division that has a new book out.
NPR

With NBA Season In Jeopardy, WNBA Plays On

While basketball fans are despairing at the prospect of at least some of the NBA season being canceled due a labor dispute, there is professional basketball being played right now. Guy Raz talks to sportswriter Stefan Fatsis about the Women's NBA finals — and the state of labor talks in the NBA.
NPR

1985 Chicago Bears Finally Get Their Due With White House Visit

The 1985 Chicago Bears team finished a dream season by winning the Super Bowl, 46-10, over the New England Patriots. But unlike most modern championship teams, the Bears didn't make it to the White House — their trip was preempted by the Challenger shuttle disaster.
NPR

Banned U.S. Sprinter Wins Olympics Appeal; Other Cases May Follow

In allowing U.S. sprinter LaShawn Merritt to compete, the court said the IOC rule known as the "Osaka Rule" is "invalid and unenforceable" because it extends punishments beyond the guidelines of the World Anti-Doping Code.

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