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'100 Yards To Glory': What Eli Manning Told Bob Costas About His Pores

Bob Costas talks to Robert Siegel about his new book, the history of football, and what's really our "national pastime."
NPR

Boxing Aficionados Remember 'Smokin' Joe' Frazier

Former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier died Monday night at the age of 67, just a month after being diagnosed with liver cancer. "Smokin' Joe," as he was called, was known for his powerful left hook that knocked down Muhammad Ali in 1971 at Madison Square Garden.
NPR

Sugar Ray Leonard Remembers Joe Frazier

Fraizer, the former world heavyweight boxing champion, was known for his crushing left hook, a career of 32 wins and four losses, and his rivalry with Muhammad Ali. Frazier recently died after a fight with liver cancer. Host Michel Martin discusses his life and legacy with Stiffjab.net editor Gautham Nagesh and boxing great Sugar Ray Leonard.
NPR

Penn State Officials Face Charges Related To Sex-Abuse Scandal

Two top administrators at Penn State University were in court Monday. They're facing charges in connection with an investigation into alleged sexual abuse by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.
NPR

Should Penn State Clean House, Including Paterno?

Allegations that a former assistant football coach was sexually abusing young boys, and that university officials didn't tell police, are raising questions about whether it's time for Joe Paterno to step aside.
NPR

Remembering Joe Frazier And An Epic Boxing Rivalry

The man nicknamed "Smokin' Joe" was one of the greatest heavyweights in history, and his three fights in the 1970s with bitter rival Muhammad Ali are part of boxing lore. Frazier died Monday in Philadelphia at age 67.
NPR

Boxer Joe Frazier, Who Beat Ali In The 'Fight Of The Century,' Has Died

Frazier and Muhammad Ali fought three classic bouts in the early '70s. In the first, Frazier won. Ali came back to win the next two.
NPR

Some Local Businesses Hurting Without NBA Assist

The NBA's ongoing lockout affects the hometown cities in different ways. While most large cities with a professional basketball team can attract fans with other professional sports, in places like Oklahoma City, businesses suffer as a result. Economists estimate each lost game is a million-dollar hit to the city's economy.

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