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NPR

Reminders Flood In: Athletes Are People, Not Heroes

We often put athletes on a pedestal. But after the latest accusations of bad behavior — accusations that include a murder charge against Oscar Pistorius — it may be time to lower that pedestal several notches, says Frank Deford.
NPR

Spanish Doctor Accused Of Helping Athletes Dope, Botching Treatments

Lance Armstrong's ex-teammate testified Tuesday at the trial of a Spanish doctor accused of masterminding one of the world's largest doping rings. Tyler Hamilton, who was stripped of his 2004 Olympic gold for doping, says he was a client of Dr. Eufemiano Fuentes. He described secret meetings with the doctor at the side of a highway in Spain, and how he and the doctor used secret telephones to arrange blood transfusions. Hamilton told the court that one 2004 transfusion from Fuentes went bad, and turned his urine black.
NPR

VIDEO: First 'Unassisted' Backflip By A Car?

Check it out: A modified Mini Cooper Countryman took to a snowy ramp in France and nailed a successful landing. It's said to be the first time a driver completed such a flip without a special ramp that would give some oomph to the car's rotation.
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Judge Says $50M ACC Lawsuit Against UMD Will Go Forward

The University of Maryland is poised to join the Big Ten in 2014, but the issue of whether they will have to pay an exit fee of $52 million is far from resolved.

NPR

Doping Trial May Reach Far Beyond Spain, And Cycling

A famous doctor is on trial in Spain, accused of masterminding one of the world's largest sports doping rings. Dr. Eufemiano Fuentes' client list is believed to include at least one former teammate of disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong. The doctor says he treated athletes from other sports, as well.
NPR

Loss Of Olympic Prospects A Blow To High School Wrestlers

The International Olympic Committee's decision to cut wrestling from the 2020 Summer Games came as a surprise to the quarter of a million high school wrestlers around the country. The fear is that if colleges follow suit, there might not be a future for wrestling beyond high school.

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