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Dirty Money: A Microbial Jungle Thrives In Your Wallet

A look at the critters that live on money finds about 3,000 types of bacteria. Most are harmless. But researchers found traces of DNA from anthrax and drug-resistant pathogens, too.
NPR

Green GOP Group Caught Between 'Rock And A Hard Place'

On Earth Day 2014, it wasn't easy being an environmental organization in the Republican Party. The big donors who write checks aren't much interested in the environment.
NPR

A Knuckleball No More: World Cup Soccer Ball Gets A Redesign

John Eric Goff, the chair of the physics department at Lynchburg College, explains the science of the 2014 World Cup soccer ball.
NPR

The Wonders Of The Year 2014, As Told By Isaac Asimov

To mark the 50th anniversary of the 1964 New York World's Fair, we turn back to some predictions that The New York Times commissioned Isaac Asimov to make on the occasion. He got many things right.
NPR

Introducing A Divorce Rate For Birds, And Guess Which Bird Never, Ever Divorces?

A pair of swans suggests Love Eternal. You often see them in twos, gliding together. But they're not Nature's Coupliest Birds. Which are?
NPR

Powerful Narcotic Painkiller Up For FDA Approval

The FDA is weighing the pros and cons of a drug that would, for the first time, combine morphine and oxycodone in a single pill. Critics warn that it could launch a new wave of abuse.
NPR

Who's Protecting Whom From Deadly Toxin?

Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
NPR

Powdered Liquor: Now Legal But Won't Be In Your Margarita Soon

The feds have approved dehydrated versions of vodka and even mojitos. Simply add water and voila! You've got a cocktail. But red tape will likely keep the high-proof powder off the market for a while.
NPR

Robotic Exoskeleton Helps Get Vets Back On Their Feet

Several bio-tech companies are developing exoskeletons that give people superhuman abilities. But these robotic suits are also doing something simpler: They're helping paralyzed veterans walk again.
NPR

Forced To Put Its Nets Away, One Fla. Town Clams Up — Literally

Since Florida banned gill nets 20 years ago, University of Florida researchers have helped Cedar Key replace commercial fishing with aquaculture. The area's now among the most productive clam farming regions in the U.S.

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