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Supporting A Spouse With Alzheimer's: 'I Don't Get Angry Anymore'

Mary Catherine O'Brien says when she first married her husband Greg in 1977, he was funny and outgoing. Alzheimer's disease has stolen much of that, she says, but the two are closer than ever.
NPR

This Just (Flew) In: The Formerly 'Extinct' Jerdon's Babbler

The sparrow-sized bird, native to Myanmar, hadn't been seen since 1941. But recently a team of scientists recorded its call and played it back, attracting more of the tan-colored subspecies.
NPR

These Tunes Are Music To Your Cats' Furry Ears

Composer David Teie's most recent compositions are catered to our feline friends. His music mimics purring, and might be just the thing to perk your cat up.
NPR

FDA Approves First Of New Type Of Generic Drugs

So-called biosimilar drugs closely mimic existing drugs but are made from living cells, blood components and tissue. In some cases, they could substantially reduce the cost of drugs.
NPR

Could A Quokka Beat A Numbat? Oddsmakers Say Yes

In "Mammal March Madness," you win or die. No basketball in this tournament — it's a simulated survival-of-the-fittest game set up by evolutionary biologists. The battle cry? Mammals suck ... milk!
NPR

NASA Probe Reaches Orbit Around Dwarf Planet

NASA's Dawn mission has reached its destination and is orbiting the dwarf planet Ceres. It's the end of an odyssey to explore an odd, in-between world.
NPR

Eat Your Veggies! Even The Ones From Fukushima

Foods from Fukushima, Japan, are back to pre-accident levels of radiation but people still aren't eating them. One way to ease concerns: a chemical that blocks radioactive cesium from entering plants.
NPR

Arsenic Antidote Hidden In Our Genes

Even at low doses, the potent poison damages organs and causes cancers. Now scientists have found a population high in the Andes Mountains that has adapted to the toxic metal over thousands of years.
NPR

Study: At 'Rate My Professors,' A Foreign Accent Can Hurt A Teacher's Score

A recent study found that teachers with Asian-sounding names were given poorer marks, and their accents were the main reason.
NPR

We're Not Taking Enough Lunch Breaks. Why That's Bad For Business

Research shows that only 1 in 5 five people takes a break and leaves his desk to eat. Most workers are simply eating at their desks. But creativity can take a big hit without a change of scenery.

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