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Why People Take Risks To Help Others: Altruism's Roots In The Brain

In the face of natural disasters and disease, there are always people who step forward to help. Their brains may tell why. This story originally aired on Sept. 22 on Morning Edition.
NPR

A Bus Isn't The Only Thing That Can Be Powered By Poop

Human waste can help things grow and even cook your dinner. It might sound gross, but don't worry, the odor has been removed. Plus: It's good for the environment!
NPR

What Microbes Lurked In The Last Public Restroom You Used?

A census of bacteria and viruses on the floors, toilets and soap dispensers of several bathrooms on a college campus turned up around 77,000 different types of organisms. Oh, joy.
NPR

Starfish Illness Harms Other Sea Creatures

Starfish in the Pacific northwest are being decimated by what's called wasting disease. Researcher Drew Harvell tells NPR's Scott Simon that warming seas are making it worse.
NPR

Shrinking Glaciers Could Squeeze Washington's Water Supply

Washington state is home to more glaciers than any other state in the lower 48. And they're receding faster than ever before.
NPR

Why Do We Undervalue Introverts?

In a culture where being social and outgoing are celebrated, it can be difficult to be an introvert. Susan Cain argues introverts bring extraordinary talents to the world, and should be celebrated.
NPR

How Do Years Of Silence Change Someone?

For almost three decades, John Francis has been a planetwalker, traveling the globe by foot and sail with a silent message of environmental responsibility. For 17 years he didn't speak a word.
NPR

Why Would Someone Choose Silence For 17 Years?

For almost three decades, John Francis has been a planetwalker, traveling the globe by foot and sail with a silent message of environmental respect. For 17 of those years he didn't speak a word.
NPR

How Can We Find More Time To Be Still?

Pico Iyer says sitting still and reflecting is hard work, but we bring so much more to our experiences and relationships when we make time to think.
NPR

Blind From Birth, But Able To Use Sound To 'See' Faces

The area of the brain that recognizes faces can use sound instead of sight. That recent discovery suggests facial recognition is so important to humans that it's part of our most basic wiring.

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