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Dog Flu Virus Spreading Across The United States

One strain of dog flu causing outbreaks in the U.S. appears to be especially contagious, making it likely more dogs than usual will get sick, veterinarians say. Still, 90 percent of cases are mild.
NPR

We Sampled The Gastronomic Frontier Of Virtual Reality

Project Nourished uses a variety of tricks to fool the mind into thinking it's eating. The goal: to let us consume our favorite tastes without unwanted extras — like food allergens or just calories.
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Why Do Humans Have Chins? A Scientist Explains The 'Enduring Puzzle'

James Pampush devoted five years and his Ph.D. dissertation to one question: Why do homo sapiens have chins, when all of our evolutionary relatives don't? He tells NPR's Robert Siegel about "the enduring puzzle of the human chin."
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Scientists Use Genetic Engineering To Vanquish Disease-Carrying Insects

A city in Brazil is using a genetically modified mosquito to control the spread of diseases like Dengue fever and the Zika virus. NPR reports on whether the scheme is working.
NPR

30 Years After Explosion, Challenger Engineer Still Blames Himself

Bob Ebeling, an anonymous source for NPR's 1986 report on the disaster, tells NPR that despite warning NASA of troubles before the launch, he believes God "shouldn't have picked me for that job."
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Still Uninsured? Buy A Health Plan This Week To Avoid A Tax Penalty

Millions are still uninsured, even as the Jan. 31 deadline to sign up for a plan under the Affordable Care Act approaches. No deadline extensions this year, federal health officials warn.
NPR

NPR Contest: Send Us Your Stories Of Happy Accidents In Science

Scientists need curiosity, determination — and luck. We're especially interested in that last bit, so tell us your stories of mistakes and surprises that led to discoveries in the past few years.
NPR

Track Jupiter's Path Like An Ancient Babylonian

Clay tablets show that Babylonian astronomers tracked planets using a method that was thought to be invented 1,400 years later. In a way, scientists say, the ancient techniques were "very modern."
NPR

Shifting Colors Of An Octopus May Hint At A Rich, Nasty Social Life

When the gloomy octopus of Australia turns dark and towers threateningly over his neighbor, he's likely signaling aggression, scientists now say. Neighbors get the message — they turn pale and flee.
NPR

A Big El Niño Was The Likely Instigator Of Last Week's Blizzard

The weather trail that led to a blizzard in the Mid-Atlantic likely started with a very warm Pacific, scientists suspect. Whether climate shifts will bring more strong El Niños is still uncertain.

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