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A Bird Flies Into A Hurricane. Does It Fly Out?

Many migratory birds travel thousands of miles every year, over land and sea and, sometimes, through hurricanes. Host Scott Simon talks to Dr. Bryan Watts from the College of William and Mary, who used satellite transmitters to track shorebirds as they flew through Hurricane Irene.
NPR

Looking Into The Galaxy's Heart (It's Red)

NASA gives us a look at the center of the galaxy, in the form of an infrared image that penetrates the dust clouds that obscure the core in the visible spectrum. The result shows "the glow of hot hydrogen in space," the space agency says.
NPR

Video Pick: Mapping Flames

Tadd Truscott and Dale Tree, engineers at Brigham Young University, are videoing fire with high speed cameras to try to make a 3D reconstruction of a flame. Poetic and practical, they say: quantifying flames could help us burn fuel more cleanly and efficiently.
NPR

Remembering Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs, co-founder and longtime CEO of Apple Inc., passed away this week at the age of 56. Technology writer Steven Levy, author of the book Insanely Great remembers the life and contributions of the technology titan, from pioneering personal computers to the iPhone.
NPR

A Virtual Arm That Talks With The Brain

Scientists have created a virtual arm that monkeys can move with their thoughts--and the arm can send information back to the brain about the textures of what it touches. Neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis talks about how this may lead to a full-body suit that helps paralyzed people move and walk again.
NPR

Physics Nobelists Observed An Accelerating Universe

In 1998, two teams of physicists looking at distant supernovae noticed something surprising--the supernovae were not only moving outwards but also accelerating. These observations have won three Americans the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics. Nobelist Adam Riess discusses how physicists are now looking at the universe.
NPR

Is Human Violence On The Wane?

Considering the Norway shootings, drug wars in Mexico and ongoing conflicts in the Middle East, this era may seem as violent as any. But as Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker argues in his book The Better Angels of Our Nature, this may actually be the most peaceable period in human history.
NPR

Mars Rover Peers Into The Endeavour Crater

Opportunity, one of two rovers launched in 2003, has traversed thirteen miles in the three years it's been on Mars. It's now at the lip of a 14-mile-wide crater named Endeavour. Project leader Steve Squyres discusses the rover's findings and what NASA hopes to learn.

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