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Legal Battles Over Land Rights, Pipelines Are On The Rise

The industry estimates that the U.S. will need to add 2,000 miles of pipeline per year, and that's just natural gas. Oil will need its own infrastructure. That means there will be a lot of pipeline going through a lot of private land — along with sometimes long, drawn-out legal fights with landowners.
NPR

Farm To Fido: Dog Food Goes Local

Feeding your pooch with locally sourced meats and vegetables may seem like the culinary equivalent of a Versace pet bowl. But producers of this posh-sounding pet food say it can cut down on food waste and help farmers.
NPR

Chris Hadfield On Going Viral In Space

Chris Hadfield became a star as commander of the International Space Station, reaching out via social media to offer the public entertaining glimpses into life in orbit. Shortly after his return from the ISS, Hadfield announced his retirement from the Canadian Space Agency. Linda Wertheimer talks with Hadfield about his efforts to keep the public interested in space travel.
NPR

Massive Solar Plant A Stepping Stone For Future Projects

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California's Mojave Desert will power about 140,000 homes and be a boon to the state's renewable energy goals. But it was no slam dunk. Now, California is trying to bring conservationists and energy companies together to create a smoother path for future projects.
NPR

'Batman' Style: How We Can See With Sound, Too

Echolocation: Birds do it, bats do it, and now even educated people do it. A team of researchers has devised an algorithm that could give the rest of us a way to discover our surroundings without using our eyes.
NPR

Conservationists Call For Quiet: The Ocean Is Too Loud!

Man-made noises are making it difficult for creatures to hear each other in the ocean. Michael Jasny, in charge of marine mammal protection the Natural Resource Defense Council, says we have to quiet down. His and other conservation groups are making their case, seeking ways to turn down the volume.
NPR

The Rise Of Bloodsucking Insects You Can't Just Swat Away

Bugs and summertime go hand-in-hand, but we are increasingly coming into contact with once-rare, disease-carrying insects. Buzzing in our ears, these pests have lots to say about globalization and the creep of invasive species.
NPR

50 Years On, Research On Sex Can Still Be A Lightning Rod

Virginia Masters, who died this week at age 88, pioneered the rigorous scientific study of sex. Even though the field has gone mainstream, scientists say they can still run into trouble with Congress and advocacy groups for choosing to look into sexual behavior and biology.
NPR

Hating On Fat People Just Makes Them Fatter

Some people rationalize that it's all right to shame or blame someone who's overweight because it will motivate the victim to lose pounds. News for the slim and smug: It doesn't work, and it's not OK.
NPR

MERS Virus Update

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an illness caused by a newly discovered virus in the same family as SARS. Most of the documented cases have come from Saudi Arabia, which has seen a 54 percent mortality rate in those patients. Martin Cetron, director of the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses the emerging virus.

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