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Invasion Of The Mind-Controlling Zombie Parasites

A few months back, something terrible happened to millions of flies around Washington, D.C. They were attacked by a fungus that basically made them zombies, unable to control their behavior. and flies are far from the only vulnerable creatures out there.
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Spy Satellite Engineer's Top Secret Is Revealed

Phil Pressel designed film cameras for a U.S. spy satellite program that was declassified last month after 46 years. His cameras captured Soviet missile sites and enabled President Nixon to sign an arms reduction treaty with the Soviet Union.
NPR

Eating Your Way To A Healthy Heart (If You're A Python)

Pythons can eat up to quarter of their body weight, or 40 pounds, in one meal. It turns out those huge meals are good for their hearts and may offer insight into how to treat heart disease in humans.
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After Scandal, Solar Industry Looks On Bright Side

At an international solar convention, companies were optimistic about their future and new products. There are certainly causes for concern in the industry — like a looming controversy over China's subsidization practices — but industry executives point to fast growth and new ideas in the market.
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Romney Seemingly Shifts On Climate Change

Thursday in Pittsburgh, Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney appeared to shift his position on climate change. Speaking at the Consol Energy Center, he said, "My view is that we don't know what's causing climate change on this planet." In his book No Apology and in earlier public appearances, Romney has said that he believes climate change is occurring — and that humans are a contributing factor. At a campaign appearance in New Hampshire back in August, Romney emphasized questions about the extent of the human role. But his remarks in Pittsburgh represent a clear shirt toward a skeptical position on the causes of climate change.
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Scientific Case Still Open On 2001 Anthrax Attacks

Army microbiologist Bruce Ivins, the FBI's prime suspect in the 2001 anthrax attacks, died before his trial in an apparent suicide, and the case is now closed. John Dankosky and guests discuss new investigations that question whether scientific evidence against Ivins was conclusive enough to hold up in court.
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Brian Greene Explains 'The Fabric Of The Cosmos'

In a new four-part television special based on his best-selling book, physicist Brian Greene takes on the nature of time and space, multiverses, and other hard-to-wrap-your-mind-around concepts in cosmology. Greene talks with guest host John Dankosky about the new series.
NPR

Analysis Questions Flu Shot Effectiveness

A new report in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases says evidence that the flu shot offers protection in adults aged 65 years or older is lacking. Host John Dankosky and guests discuss the report, the upcoming flu season, and whether seniors should get the flu vaccine.

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