Science | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Science

RSS Feed
NPR

In Scott's Race To The Pole, Science Beat Speed

A hundred years ago, two teams were racing to the South Pole. The Norwegian team led by Roald Amundsen made it first, beating British explorer Robert Scott. But only Scott did pioneering science--and photography--along the way. Ira Flatow and guests discuss the achievements of the first Antarctic expeditions.
NPR

Mosquitoes Engineered To Kill Their Own Kind

Reporting in Nature Biotechnology, researchers write of genetically engineering mosquitoes to pass lethal genes to their offspring, in hopes of crashing populations of one dengue-transmitting species. Science writer Bijal Trivedi talks about recent tests of the bugs, and the concerns of critics.
NPR

How An Elegant Moth Stays Aloft

To feed, the hawk moth unrolls a long proboscis, sticks it in a flower like a straw, and slurps up nectar. It looks like a hummingbird feeding. Like the hummingbird, the moth has to be stable in the air to get a drink. Biologist Ty Hedrick filmed the moths with high-speed video to try to understand how they hold steady.
NPR

Pondering the Possibility of Non-constant 'Constants'

What if the laws of physics aren't the same all over the universe, but vary from place to place? Michael Murphy of the Swinburne University of Technology discusses research published in the journal Physical Review Letters indicating that the value of one basic physical property, the fine structure constant, may vary with location in interstellar space.
NPR

Climate Change Has Calif. Vintners Rethinking Grapes

Familiar French varieties aren't well-suited to high temperatures, so some researchers suggest cross-breeding to make the grapes more heat tolerant or drought-resistant. But once you breed pinot noir with something else, you can't call it pinot noir anymore. And marketing new wines is a challenge.
NPR

Secret To A Long, Healthy Life: Bike To The Store

Even if people used bikes to run short errands than half the time, it could save more than 1,100 lives a year in 11 Midwestern cities, thanks to reduced air pollution and improved health. That's the word from scientists at the University of Wisconsin, who figured people would bike 4 months out of the year.
NPR

How Fear Drove World Rice Markets Insane

No one can guarantee that the rice crisis of 2008 won't happen again. A lot of damage remains from the disaster that sent rice prices soaring even while there was plenty of rice. And there's still some of the fear that produced the crisis in the first place.
NPR

Miss. Set To Vote On Measure Making Fetus A Person

A personhood amendment on the state ballot would declare that life begins at conception. There is support for the measure in the conservative state but opposition from groups that say its broad language could limit contraception and threaten fertility treatments.

Pages