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This Machine Can Suck Carbon Out Of The Air

While carbon dioxide streams into the atmosphere from tailpipes and smokestacks around the world, one man is building a machine to suck it back out. And some heavy-hitting investors are betting that it's going to work.
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NASA Satellite Expected To Collide With Earth

According to NASA, a retired U.S. research satellite the size of a school bus has been sucked into the Earth's gravitational pull. The space agency expects the satellite to break into pieces on entry to the atmosphere, and for some of those pieces — some as heavy as 300 pounds — to rain down later this week. Donald Kessler, who served as NASA's senior scientist for orbital debris research, tells Michele Norris that an event of this nature is highly unusual — and odds are slim that the debris will injure people or destroy property.
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Lucretius, Man Of Modern Mystery

In his new book, author and Harvard literature professor Stephen Greenblatt explores the 2,000 year-old writings of Lucretius and his "spookily modern" creation tale.
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Documenting The Sound Of Fallen Trees (And Planes)

Researchers at Crater Lake National Park in Oregon have been documenting the park's soundscape. But human-caused noises, like airplanes, are making it harder to hear.
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Glowing Kittens Help In Fight Against AIDS

Millions of cats suffer and die from feline AIDS every year. Scientists have found a way to prevent infection by injecting cat eggs with monkey genes that block HIV infection. And to help identify cats with the special genes, they added jellyfish genes to the mix.
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Obama Signs Patent Overhaul Bill

Hoping it will spur innovation, President Obama signed a bill Friday overhauling the nation's patent laws. The law switches to a "first to file" rule for granting patents. It also allows new challenges to existing patents. But critics say it will not help individual inventors get their ideas to market. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Laura Sydell for more.
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Balancing Budgets And R&D

With all forms of federal spending under the microscope, spending on scientific research, technology development, and science education is facing deep cuts. In an editorial in the journal Science Congressman Rush Holt argues for keeping research and development as a key part of the federal budget.

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