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New U.S. Mad Cow Case Is The First In Six Years

Robert Siegel speaks with Jim Culler, director of the University of California, Davis Food Safety Lab, about a recent report of mad cow disease in the U.S. Culler says this particular strain is rare and not known to cross species. He says the U.S. Department of Agriculture is now in the process of tracing the cow's history to find out where she's been.
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Buying Sustainable Fish Is Getting Easier, But It's Still Hard

Even as some retailers are turning to certification schemes and rating systems to offer consumers trustworthy choices, the art of sustainable seafood buying now requires a sophisticated understanding of geography and science on the part of the consumer.
NPR

Tech Entrepreneurs Bet Big On Asteroid Mining

The idea of exploiting the natural resources on asteroids has been around for more than a century. But a new company called Planetary Resources has the financial backing of some big names in high tech, and hopes to launch specially-designed prospecting spacecraft within two years.
NPR

A Bug's Life: Store Caters To Collectors Of Crawly Pets

Ken "The Bug Guy" MacNeil, host of the Science Channel's Bugging Out, has opened a pet shop devoted to insects in Tucson, Ariz. His inventory of about 10,000 includes tarantulas, scorpions and hissing cockroaches from Madagascar, all for sale as pets.
NPR

First Criminal Charges Filed In BP Gulf Oil Spill

The first criminal charges were filed on Tuesday in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster. An engineer for BP was charged with obstruction of justice for deleting hundreds of text messages after the spill. Carrie Johnson talks to Robert Siegel.
NPR

Bird Flu Scientist Has Applied For Permit To Export Research

The Dutch scientist at the center of the controversy over recent bird flu experiments says that his team applied for government permission Tuesday to submit a paper describing their research to a science journal. He is optimistic the request will be granted, but had hoped he wouldn't need the special permit.
NPR

Melt Or Grow? Fate Of Himalayan Glaciers Unknown

A few years ago, the U.N.'s climate panel warned that the Himalayas' glaciers were quickly disappearing. The claim was dead wrong. The true picture of how the ice in those glaciers is responding to a warming world is far more complex. "There are so many uncertainties that it's really hard to predict the future of the glaciers," says one scientist.

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