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NPR

Photographers, Skywatchers Prepare For Supermoon

The biggest full moon of the year happens Saturday night. Expect the best time for photos just after sunset.
NPR

Greenland's Ice Melting More Slowly Than Expected

While the glaciers hold enough water to raise sea level feet by 20 feet, a new study says the runaway meltdown of Greenland's ice isn't happening as some had feared. This means a "worst-case scenario" of 6 feet of sea level rise by the end of this century is unlikely, a polar researcher says.
WAMU 88.5

New Dinosaur Hall Object Of $35M Smithsonian Donation

Billionaire and and conservative political donor David Koch has made a $35 million donation to the Smithsonian for the construction of a new dinosaur hall.

NPR

Put Away The Bell Curve: Most Of Us Aren't 'Average'

For decades, teachers, managers and parents have assumed that the performance of students and employees fits what's known as the bell curve — in most activities, we expect a few people to be very good, a few people to be very bad and most people to be average. But new research argues that a lot of people are actually outliers.
NPR

First Of Controversial Bird Flu Studies Is Published

The paper describes experiments that suggest just a few genetic changes could potentially make a bird flu virus capable of becoming contagious in humans, and causing a dangerous pandemic. A fierce debate has raged over this study for months, because of fears that the work might provide a recipe for turning bird flu into a bioweapon.
NPR

A Step Forward For Gene Therapy To Treat HIV

Years after more than 40 patients with HIV received immune cells designed to attack and kill cells infected with HIV, the specialized cells are still present in their bloodstreams. There's been no sign the cells, a form of gene therapy, caused any serious side effects.
NPR

ExxonMobil: A 'Private Empire' On The World Stage

In Private Empire, investigative journalist Steve Coll explains how ExxonMobil has used its money and power to wield significant influence in Washington, D.C., concerning issues like climate change.
WAMU 88.5

Local Trees

DC was historically known as the "City of Trees," and it's still true today, with nearly forty percent of the city covered by tree canopy. We'll find out the best places to see enjoy our green bounty, and talk to the department responsible for caring for all those trees.

NPR

Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things

Enron, Worldcom, Bernie Madoff — the past decade has brought us a long parade of headlines involving unethical behavior. And that's led researchers to a disturbing conclusion: The vast majority of us are not only capable of behaving in profoundly unethical ways, but without realizing it, we do it all the time. Exhibit A: the story of Toby Groves.

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