Science | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Science

RSS Feed
NPR

Bacterial Armor Imaged, Down To The Details

Reporting in Nature, an international team of scientists say they've visualized the structure of a protective protein coat that surrounds many bacteria, down to the scale of a single atom. Structural microbiologist Han Remaut, co-author of the study, discusses potential applications of the research.
NPR

How The Morning-After Pill Works

Mitt Romney referred to morning after-pills as 'abortive pills.' The FDA-approved label on Plan B indicates it may prevent fertilized eggs from implanting in a woman's uterus. Dr. Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson, an obstetrics and gynecology professor at Karolinska Institute, discusses the growing scientific evidence to the contrary.
NPR

Virus Hunter Recalls Discovery Of Ebola And HIV

In No Time to Lose: A Life In Pursuit of Deadly Viruses, microbiologist Peter Piot writes of the years he spent in the jungles of central Africa investigating mysterious viral diseases like Ebola and HIV, and recalls the bureaucratic struggles of leading UNAIDS.
NPR

Neanderthals: The Oldest Cave Painters?

Reporting in Science, researchers write that a red disk painted in Spain's El Castillo cave is at least 40,800 years old--making it the oldest known European cave art. Archaeologist Alistair Pike discusses how his team dated the disk, and whether Neanderthals could have painted it.
NPR

Putting a Friendly Face on Statistics

A better way to represent data could turn numbers into features. Marc Abrahams, editor of the Annals of Improbable Research, talks about why people are better at recognizing faces than staring at statistics, and if merging the two could make data accessible to everyone.
NPR

Famous Cave Paintings Might Not Be From Humans

The eerie stencil paintings of human hands in Spanish caves might not be from humans at all. New dating methods of the paintings suggest some of the cave art is more than 40,000 years old and could have been drawn by Neanderthals.
NPR

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Investigates The Space Science Of Summer Movies

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson keeps a close eye on science in the movies — he even got a change made to Titanic. Here, he talks about truths and less-than-truths in some of the films that are taking us outside our own realm.
NPR

Mozambique Farmland Is Prize In Land Grab Fever

Villagers say they're getting a raw deal as companies rush to buy up African land to form mega-farms. Farmers complain they've been ousted from the land while promises to improve water systems and schools and replant uprooted crops are not being kept.

Pages