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'You Are Getting Sleepy,' Said The Scientist To The Fruit Fly

Research on sleep-deprived fruit flies identified specific brain cells that can trigger sleep. The finding of these sleep circuits in insects could help scientists better understand human insomnia.
WAMU 88.5

Roger Thurow: "The First 1,000 Days: A Crucial Time For Mothers And Children—And The World"

A new book tells the story of the First 1,000 Days movement, an international effort to end malnutrition during the most crucial time of development, from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday.

NPR

For Wheelchair Users, A RoboDesk For Electronic Devices

An Indiana inventor hopes his tray mount will help bridge gaps in education tech and eliminate some of the stigma associated with coming to class in a wheelchair.
NPR

In Search For Cures, Scientists Create Embryos That Are Both Animal And Human

Researchers experimenting with chimeric embryos say they could develop into adult pigs, sheep or cows with human organs that one day might be suitable for transplantation in people.
NPR

Can A Tiny Wasp Save The Citrus Industry?

Citrus greening, spread by a ravenous pest, has destroyed millions of acres of fruit and cost billions in damage. Fortunately, these pernicious peewees are prime prey for another parasitic predator.
NPR

Autism Can Be An Asset In The Workplace, Employers And Workers Find

Roughly 40 percent of young adults with autism spectrum disorder aren't finding jobs. But some employers are now recruiting adults on the spectrum as an untapped talent pool of focused workers.
WAMU 88.5

What Satellite Images Are Teaching Us About Life On Earth

Satellite imagery is becoming critical to what we do on the ground, including disaster relief, economic projections, and monitoring environmental change. We look at what pictures from above can teach us about life on earth.

NPR

Salt-Resistant Rice Offers Hope For Farmers Clinging To Disappearing Islands

Climate change is reshaping land and lives in India's Sundarbans region, where paddies are being overrun by saltwater. But resilient varieties of rice may let vulnerable families stay a while longer.
NPR

Experts Fear Climate Change Will Lead To More Tiger Attacks In The Sundarbans

Deep in the world's largest mangrove forest, which spans India's border with Bangladesh, rangers protect wild Bengal tigers. Rising seas may have rangers and tigers competing for a place to live.
NPR

Girls And Older Adults Are Missing Out On Parks For Recreation

A survey of parks in 25 major cities find that they're used mostly by young children and teenage boys. Walking loops and other options that would appeal to women are in short supply.

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