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Taking A Walk On New York's Wild Side

New York City has been referred to as a concrete jungle. But researchers say it is more 'jungle' than you might think. A panel of experts discuss the plant and animal life found in city waters and green spaces. They also discuss the impact of urbanization and climate change on a city's biodiversity.
NPR

Early Spring Means Bugs — Lots Of Bugs

There seem to be a lot of bugs in certain parts of the country this spring. Richmond, Virginia reports an unusual amount of cankerworms this spring; Iowa experienced surprisingly thick swarms of fungus gnats about two weeks ago; and then there's the increasing issue of stinkbugs in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic. Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish talk about what people are seeing, and what experts think is going on.
NPR

White-Nose Syndrome: A Scourge In The Bat Caves

The disease has killed more than 5.5 million bats in the eastern United States and Canada and is making its way west. White-nose syndrome has been diagnosed in three Missouri bats — the first confirmed cases west of the Mississippi — and scientists say it won't stop there.
NPR

Feds Interview New Witnesses In Polar Bear Probe

The interviews are part of an ongoing investigation of government scientists who described seeing dead polar bears in Arctic waters in 2006. Investigators were apparently interested in archived aerial surveys, suggesting their probe remains focused on the scientific integrity of the 2006 paper.
NPR

Link Between Extreme Weather And Climate Change

2011 brought exceptionally mild winters in most of the U.S., deadly tornadoes in the Midwest and extended drought in the West and Southwest. Kevin Trenberth, distinguished senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, discusses the correlation between climate change and extreme weather.
NPR

Chocolate Bilbies, Not Bunnies, For An Australian Easter

In Australia, the bunny may rule the burrows, but the bilby, a native marsupial whose population has dwindled, rules the Easter basket.
NPR

Shake It Off: Earth's Wobble May Have Ended Ice Age

Some 20,000 years ago, the Earth wobbled on its axis. That happens periodically. But according to a new scenario, this particular time, that wobble sparked a chain reaction of events that melted glaciers and led to a gradual warming of the planet.
NPR

Pollution Playing A Major Role In Sea Temperatures

Tiny particles from power plants and fires help create new clouds, which shade the oceans from the sun. This means changes in sea-surface temperatures. And that has profound effects on weather, influencing the time and amount of rainfall in West Africa, and even the number, strength and path of hurricanes.

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