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The Science Of Yoga: The Risks And The Rewards

In his book The Science of Yoga: The Risks and the Rewards, New York Times science writer and long-time yoga practitioner William Broad investigates popular health claims about yoga--that it boosts metabolism, for example--and finds that scientific studies tell a different story.
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Drug Rapidly Counters Effects of Alzheimer's In Mice

Reporting in Science, researchers write that an FDA-approved drug for skin cancer had surprising results in mice with Alzheimer's. The drug rapidly cleared up amyloid protein from the brain and improved cognitive function. Co-author Gary Landreth discusses the drug's potential as a therapy for Alzheimer's.
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Next Supercontinent Could Form At The North Pole

Several times in earth's history continents have collided to form supercontinents only to later break apart. Geologist Ross Mitchell discusses a new study in Nature that predicts in 50 to 200 million years time the Americas and Eurasia will collide to form a supercontinent over the Arctic.
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Why Vinyl Sounds Better Than CD, Or Not

According to Rolling Stone magazine, sales of vinyl albums continue to grow, setting a new record in 2010. Does vinyl reproduce sound better, or is it just a trend? Two audio experts join guest host John Dankosky to talk about the science of audio, and how perceptions can shape the sound experience.
NPR

How My Voice Went Silent

After coming down with a mysterious headache and a blazing sore throat, NPR science correspondent Richard Harris lost his voice. And it didn't come back. Doctors eventually pinpointed the cause: a paralyzed vocal cord.
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Nuclear Safety, Cost Issues Loom As U.S. OKs Reactor

Southern Co. will build the reactors at its Vogtle site in Georgia. An industry-backed group hopes it's the first wave of new reactors, but a coalition of groups plans to sue to stop the project. Among its arguments: Engineers are still figuring out what went wrong at the Fukushima meltdown in Japan last year.
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When Flu Pandemics Hit, Closing Schools Can Slow Spread

When schools in Alberta, Canada, closed for summer in 2009, it put the breaks on the swine flu outbreak in the province, says research from McMaster University. But authorities have to weigh the costs and benefits of preemptive closure, and there isn't always a clear answer.
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International Meeting On Controversial Bird Flu Research Draws Near

The scientists, journal editors and others who attend are expected to review the facts and the most pressing issues related to this specific work, rather than have a broader discussion about the possibility of international oversight of potentially worrisome biological research.
NPR

Drilling Team Finally Hits Antarctica's Liquid Lake

After years of trying, Russian scientists say they have drilled into an Antarctic lake that is buried beneath more than two miles of ice. They are looking for signs of life that haven't been exposed to sky in 20 million years.

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