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Could Cheap Gas Slow Growth Of Renewable Energy?

The relatively clean gas is replacing dirty coal-fired power plants. That's good news for the environment. But in the long run, cheap natural gas might delay the transition to even cleaner sources of energy, such as wind and solar power.
NPR

Clean-Tech Industry Facing Lean Times After Solyndra

The once-booming clean-tech industry is facing hard times, in part because of cheaper natural gas, the effects of the financial crisis, China's growing solar industry and the Solyndra bankruptcy. Reporter Juliet Eilperin, who covers the industry's struggles in Wired's February issue, explains.
NPR

New Video Sheds More Light On Dark Side Of The Moon

The images from NASA's Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) lunar spacecraft offer a fresh view of the moon's far side.
NPR

Tick Tally Reveals Lyme Disease Risk

Researchers counted more than 5,000 ticks to calculate the risk of Lyme disease in the Eastern U.S. Turns out the risk is high in the Northeast and nearly zero in the South.
NPR

Is Today's Beef Better For The Environment?

A new study wants to rectify beef's image as an environmental miscreant. It says modern beef production is a lot kinder to the environment than it was 30 years ago.
NPR

New Silica Rules Languish In Regulatory Black Hole

Last year it looked like stricter controls would be put in place to limit workers' exposure to dangerous silica dust. But for almost a year, the proposed regulations have been stalled at the White House Office of Management and Budget. Worker safety advocates are growing frustrated, but industry stakeholders say current regulations are sufficient.
NPR

'I Wanted To Live': New Depression Drugs Offer Hope For Toughest Cases

The anesthetic and club drug ketamine seems to lift depression symptoms in a matter of hours. But how does it work? Researchers are searching for the answer in an attempt to make a new class of depression medications. "We can take care of a migraine in hours," one researcher asks. "So why do we have to wait weeks or months with depression?"

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