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NPR

Blurring The Line Between Life And Death

Science writer Dick Teresi and transplant surgeon Richard Freeman discuss the ethics of transplant surgery and how doctors determine the point between life and death.
NPR

Startup Converts Plastic To Oil, And Finds A Niche

Only 7 percent of plastic waste in the United States is recycled each year, according to the EPA. A startup company in Niagara Falls says it can increase that amount and reduce the country's dependence on foreign oil at the same time.
NPR

Domesticated Foxes: Man's New Best Friend?

What if foxes could be trained and domesticated, much the way dogs were domesticated thousands of years ago? A nearly 50-year experiment in Russia is aiming at just that.
WAMU 88.5

Smart Phones, Hybrid Cars, and the Global Competition for "Rare Earth Elements"

Ninety percent of "rare earth elements" comes from China. We explore the science and politics of "critical materials" in advanced manufacturing...

NPR

Drunk On Biology For St. Patrick's Day

This drinking song celebrates the biochemistry of getting drunk, the hangover that ensues, and the microorganism behind it all.
NPR

When Fruit Flies Strike Out, They Like To Booze It Up

Researchers made a bunch of male fruit flies into boozehounds by pushing them on females unreceptive to their advances. The experiments showed that a brain chemical, very much like one in humans, played a key role in determining their behavior.
NPR

Sizing Up America's High-Tech Talent

Business and political leaders have repeatedly warned that America's scientists and engineers are in short supply. However, some economists say the numbers indicate the opposite — a glut of high-tech workers. A panel of experts debate whether America's schools produce the scientific workforce needed to compete globally.
NPR

Mount Everest Still Holds Mysteries For Scientists

On his upcoming trip to Mount Everest, mountaineer Conrad Anker will team up with geologist Dave Lageson to remeasure the peak's exact altitude--a stat scientists still dispute. Physiologist Bryan Taylor will also be in Nepal to monitor how Anker's blood, brain and muscles respond to the thin Himalayan air.

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