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NPR

What Killed Orca Victoria? Some Point To Naval Tests

The U.S. Navy is in the process of renewing its permits to conduct sonar and explosive tests off the coast of the Pacific Northwest. But the recent unexplained death of a young orca who washed ashore in February has thrown a wrench in the process. Experts say injuries to the whale may indicate she was exposed to an underwater explosion or sonar testing.
NPR

Tight Supplies Drive Up Gas Prices In The West

Gas prices are falling overall — but in California and much of the West, they are on the rise. Tight supplies are to blame.
NPR

Town's Effort To Link Fracking And Illness Falls Short

Many residents of Dish, Texas, blame the fracking operations that surround their tiny town for a host of health problems — from nosebleeds to cancer. The former mayor was so scared, he left town. But scientists who've studied Dish say there's not enough evidence to link natural gas operations to any illness.
WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: "The Ocean of Life" by Callum Roberts

For this month's Environmental Outlook: protecting the world's oceans. A noted marine conservationist on how people are harming the seas with overfishing, pollution and greenhouse gases, and what can be done.

NPR

From Science Fiction To Fact, Robots Are Coming To A Farm Near You

Farm robots are here, not just in Star Wars. Some dairies already use milking machines that clean udders and monitor cow health, plus do the milking, and a fully automated tractor is coming out this fall.
NPR

Medical Records Could Yield Answers On Fracking

Is fracking making people sick? The question has ignited a national debate. A proposed study in northern Pennsylvania could help resolve the issue. By mining more than 10 years' worth of patient records, researchers hope to better understand the potential impact of hydraulic fracturing on health.
NPR

'Close Encounters' With Gas Well Pollution

Hundreds of thousands of natural gas wells have sprung up across the country. In Garfield County, Colo., the drilling rigs are so close to homes that some people call them "Close Encounters." When the gas boom began a decade ago, residents began asking: Is it safe to live this close? Their quest for answers became too polarizing to pursue.
NPR

Jet-Lagged By Your Social Calendar? Better Check Your Waistline

The disconnect between our social calendars and our biological clocks is creating "social jet lag," according to key researchers. And that's taking a toll on our weight because the body stores fat when it's not getting enough sleep.
NPR

Sick From Fracking? Doctors, Patients Seek Answers

Mysterious fumes wafting in from outside have repeatedly sickened several nurses at a rural Pennsylvania health clinic, forcing the clinic to temporarily relocate. Like many other people living near gas wells around the country, the clinic's staff wonder whether the industry in their backyard is making them sick.

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