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Cracking The Egg Sprinkler Mystery

If you spin a hard-boiled egg in a pool of milk, the milk will wick up the sides of the egg and spray off at the egg's equator. Engineer Tadd Truscott, of Brigham Young University, launched an investigation to figure out why this happens — complete with a custom-built spinning apparatus, billiard balls and high speed video cameras.
NPR

Gazing Into The Cloud, From Storage to Servers

Apple and Amazon want to store your music in 'the cloud,' while companies from Google to Microsoft to Zoho offer ways to wrangle your office documents there. But what exactly is the cloud, and is the time right to start using it? Technology experts Tony Bradley and Nicholas Carr look at the switch away from traditional desktop computing.
WAMU 88.5

Stuart Firestein: "Ignorance: How It Drives Science"

A neuroscientist claims that ignorance--not knowledge--is the true engine of science. He explains how scientists use ignorance to concentrate their research, and why "not knowing" is one of the greatest benefits to science.

WAMU 88.5

Kids and Dental X-Rays

Recent studies linking dental x-rays to brain tumors and cancers later in life have some parents panicked about their kids' checkups. We explore the risks of dental x-rays--and the possible consequences of avoiding them.

NPR

Photographers, Skywatchers Prepare For Supermoon

The biggest full moon of the year happens Saturday night. Expect the best time for photos just after sunset.
NPR

Greenland's Ice Melting More Slowly Than Expected

While the glaciers hold enough water to raise sea level feet by 20 feet, a new study says the runaway meltdown of Greenland's ice isn't happening as some had feared. This means a "worst-case scenario" of 6 feet of sea level rise by the end of this century is unlikely, a polar researcher says.
WAMU 88.5

New Dinosaur Hall Object Of $35M Smithsonian Donation

Billionaire and and conservative political donor David Koch has made a $35 million donation to the Smithsonian for the construction of a new dinosaur hall.

NPR

Put Away The Bell Curve: Most Of Us Aren't 'Average'

For decades, teachers, managers and parents have assumed that the performance of students and employees fits what's known as the bell curve — in most activities, we expect a few people to be very good, a few people to be very bad and most people to be average. But new research argues that a lot of people are actually outliers.
NPR

First Of Controversial Bird Flu Studies Is Published

The paper describes experiments that suggest just a few genetic changes could potentially make a bird flu virus capable of becoming contagious in humans, and causing a dangerous pandemic. A fierce debate has raged over this study for months, because of fears that the work might provide a recipe for turning bird flu into a bioweapon.

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