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NPR

Bon Voyage, Voyager: Old Friends Take Stock

Long gone, but never forgotten, Voyager 1 is about 12 billion miles from home and now sailing through interstellar space, scientists were thrilled to confirm in 2013. The spacecraft carries with it a generation's dreams.
NPR

Nothing Focuses The Mind Like The Ultimate Deadline: Death

A Swedish inventor came up with a wristwatch that counts down the seconds left in your life. He calls it "the happiness watch" because he thinks living with the reality of one's mortality can enhance how we value our lives.
NPR

Lost Images Come To Life A Century After Antarctic Expedition

Conservators have recovered and processed a clump of 22 negatives taken during Ernest Shackleton's 1914-1917 expedition to the South Pole.
NPR

On Evolution, A Widening Political Gap, Pew Says

The latest poll shows that a growing number of Republicans reject the scientific theory of evolution, while three-quarters of Democrats accept it.
NPR

Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over

How do you know you're in love? Angry? Or sad? Emotions start off in the brain, then ripple through the whole body. Now scientists have charted where we consciously feel specific emotions. They hope these sensation maps will one day help diagnose and treat mood disorders.
NPR

Lost In 2013: Three Nobel Scientists Who Saw Something In Us

Three groundbreaking scientists, all of whom won the Nobel Prize for their discoveries, died in 2013. Francois Jacob figured out how genes work. Frederick Sanger, who sequenced the first genome, is one of only four people to win two Nobel Prizes. David Hubel found out how to listen to the brain.
NPR

Security, Logistics Problems Plague Syria's Weapons Removal

The end of December is a crucial deadline for removing chemical weapons from Syria. Now the OPCW, the international organization overseeing that transfer, is backing away from that deadline. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel discusses the plan for chemical weapons removal and disposal, and why it's been so hard.
NPR

Centuries Before China's 'Great Wall,' There Was Another

Archaeologists are now mapping a wall in eastern China that is as much as 15 feet tall in some places, and predates the more famous barrier by 300 years. Hundreds of miles long, it was likely erected to keep neighboring Chinese dynasties from invading each other, historians say.
NPR

The Hunt For Meteorites Begins In Antarctica

Each winter, a team of scientists sets out on a search for those rare shooting stars that make it to the ground instead of burning up in the sky. There aren't many better places to look for these space rocks than Antarctica, often in areas where no human has set foot before.
NPR

Stretch Or Splat? How A Black Hole Kills You Matters ... A Lot

Over the past year, a roaring debate has erupted among physicists about what exactly would happen if you fell into a black hole. Would it be "spaghettification," or a quantum firestorm and oblivion where space ceases to exist? The answer has big implications for fundamental physics.

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