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Bird Flu Studies Mired In Export Control Law Limbo

Export controls designed to restrict international trade in weapons are keeping scientists from sharing their research on the bird flu virus.
WAMU 88.5

Insights from New Research into Autism

The diagnosis of autism in the U.S. has almost doubled in the past decade. Join guest host Susan Page to discuss new research on factors that might contribute to this complex condition.

NPR

Sunny Days Are Here Again — But Is That Good?

Temperatures around the nation have been unusually warm this spring. While it might be time to lie on a blanket in the park, climate scientists are worried. They say all these sunny days are actually an extreme weather event, one with local and global implications.
NPR

A 'Warm And Fuzzy' Dino? (Yes, But Mind The Teeth)

Known by its nickname "beautiful feathered tyrant," Yutyrannus huali is a cousin of T. rex, 30 feet long and about 3,000 pounds. It had no trouble tearing its prey to pieces, but the dinosaur was also a snappy dresser — it was covered in downy feathers.
NPR

Early Spring Has Farmers Battling Frost At Night

The early spring has been great for recreation and those with cabin-fever, but it's been a headache for farmers and other growers. In Wisconsin, orchard and vineyard owners have trees and vines in early bloom, but are now up at night battling frost.
WAMU 88.5

Cutting Back on Unnecessary Medical Tests and Procedures

A number of medical and consumer groups make the case less is better: a new effort to encourage doctors and hospitals to cut back on routine medical tests.

WAMU 88.5

Debate Over How to Teach Evolution and Climate Change

Tennessee's legislature approved a bill that allows teachers to challenge theories of evolution and global warming. An update on the debate over science education.

NPR

How Homo Sapiens Became 'Masters Of The Planet'

The first Homo sapiens appeared on the planet some 200,000 years ago. But even though they looked fully human, they didn't act fully human until they began creating symbolic art, some 100,000 years later. Paleoanthropologist Ian Tattersall discusses those human origins in his book Masters of the Planet.
NPR

New York City's Mayor Is A Geek At Heart

Did you know Mayor Michael Bloomberg has an engineering degree and built a ham radio as a child? The mayor talks about his passion for science and how it shapes the way he thinks. He also discusses plans for an applied sciences campus in New York and potential spin-offs from the project.

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