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Fracking Byproducts May Be Linked To Ohio Quakes

Melissa Block interviews John Armbruster, a seismologist with Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, part of Columbia University, about why he believes the waste from fracking in Ohio has led to the earthquakes there. He says the injection of waste water from the fracking process created pressure on nearby faults, and he expects the quakes to continue — even after the process is stopped.
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Exploring Stephen Hawking's 'Unfettered Mind'

The scientist is known as much for his contributions to theoretical cosmology and quantum gravity as for his willingness to make science accessible for the general public. His work is the topic of a new biography by science writer Kitty Ferguson.
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Double-Blind Violin Test: Can You Pick The Strad?

Researchers presented a group of professional violinists with a set of violins and asked them to play and then determine — based on sound alone — which were made by the famed Italian violin-maker Stradivari and Guarneri. The results surprised everyone, including the pros themselves.
NPR

Twins Data Reshaping Nature Versus Nurture Debate

Scientists have long pointed to identical twins to show that genes reign supreme in the battle of nature versus nurture. But a growing body of research suggests another factor, called epigenetics, may change how those genes are expressed. National Geographic's Peter Miller explains what science is learning from twins.
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Op-Ed: 364-Day Calendar Intriguing But Unnecessary

It's 2012 — time to throw out the 2011 calendar. But professors Richard Conn Henry and Steven Hanke say it's time to trash the Gregorian calendar altogether. The Hanke-Henry Permanent Calendar would make holidays fall on the same day of the week each year. Wired's Brandon Keim explains why he thinks the plan is not a good idea.
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What Vietnam Taught Us About Breaking Bad Habits

In the 1970s, a sizable number of U.S. servicemen in Vietnam self-identified as heroin addicts. But when they returned stateside, the number of these soldiers who continued their addiction was surprisingly low. Why? Turns out a massive disruption in their environment and routine played a big role in helping them change their behavior.
NPR

Biotech Firms Caught In Regulatory No Man's Land

Companies making genetically modified animals face a regulatory morass in this country. It's not always clear which federal agency has responsibility for regulating a particular animal, and even when one agency does take the lead, the approval process can drag on for years.
NPR

New Year? How About A New Calendar?

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have devised a different way to count our days — with a leap week every few years to keep the calendar on track.

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