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Drought In Danger Of Beaching Mississippi Barges

The drought that's impacting much the country is drying up crops and now rivers. The Mississippi River is experiencing water levels low enough to affect barge traffic. Barge companies are lightening loads, meaning more boats are needed for the same amount of cargo. Robert Siegel speaks with Mark Mestemacher, co-owner of Ceres Barge Line in St. Louis.
NPR

Five Men Agree To Stand Directly Under An Exploding Nuclear Bomb

The country was just beginning to worry about nuclear fallout, and the Air Force wanted to reassure people that it was OK to use atomic weapons. And so on July 19, 1957, five Air Force officers stood on a patch of ground in the Nevada desert and waited for the bomb to drop.

NPR

Thieving Rodents Keep Circle Of Life Going For Trees

Big seeds generally need large animals to move them around. But scientists have discovered that small mammals can sometimes move these seeds significant distances. These mammals steal the seeds from each other multiple times, moving them far from where they fell. This helps plants take root in new places.
NPR

With Funding Gone, Last Undersea Lab Could Surface

For nearly 20 years, the NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base has operated off Key Largo 60 feet underwater as the world's only undersea research station. The Obama administration has essentially killed its funding, and the staff is now working to find other money to keep the research station alive.
NPR

Can Science Plant Brain Seeds That Make You Vote?

Politics has been a profession ruled by gut instinct, gurus and polls. But over the past 15 years, the primary method of scientific advance — the randomized controlled study — has been wheedling its way into politics. Bit by bit, it's challenging a lot of the conventional wisdom that dominates current political campaigns.
NPR

Plugging In For A Better Night's Sleep

High-tech gadgets, like smartphones, keep us connected at all hours and are making it more difficult to get a good night's sleep. But several new smartphone apps claim to help users sleep better. New York Times health and fitness reporter Anahad O'Connor explains the science behind apps.

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