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Look Up, Stargazers: June 5 Is The Transit Of Venus

The rare daytime astronomical event, in which Venus can be seen as a tiny black dot crossing the sun, won't happen again until 2117. Andrea Wulf, author of Chasing Venus, explains how 18th-century astronomers used the event to calculate the distance between the Earth and the sun.
NPR

Why Do Humans Crave Crispy Food?

John S. Allen, a research scientist at the University of Southern California, explores our draw to crispy foods in a new book called The Omnivorous Mind: Our Evolving Relationship With Food. He speaks to host Guy Raz.
NPR

Ancient Suburb Near St. Louis Could Be Lost Forever

The remains of a newly discovered suburb of the ancient city of Cahokia are right in the path of a new interstate freeway in East St. Louis. Visitors paddling up from the Mississippi 900 years ago would have seen tall wooden temples atop earthen pyramids, and rows and rows of thatched-roof huts.
WAMU 88.5

Backyard Planet Gazing - The Transit of Venus

On June 5 at 6:03 p.m., Venus will appear as a small black dot floating across the surface of the sun. We explore the history and science of the Transit of Venus.

NPR

How To Grow The Tastiest Tomato? One Secret's In The Soil

Scientists still don't know exactly what growing conditions are responsible for the most flavorful tomatoes. But they have a few ideas that are worth keeping in mind as you try to coax sweetness and tartness from your garden seedlings.
NPR

Why Ignorance Trumps Knowledge In Scientific Pursuit

In Ignorance: How It Drives Science, neuroscientist Stuart Firestein writes that science is often like looking for a black cat in a dark room, and there may not be a cat in the room. Firestein discusses why the hit-or-miss process, the "not knowing" is the true engine of science.
NPR

Paralyzed Rats Walk, Even Sprint After Rehab

Reporting in Science, researchers write that a combination of therapies, willpower and chocolate helped rats with severe spinal cord injuries learn to walk and even run again. Neurobiologist Moses Chao, not affiliated with the study, discusses the rehab method and whether it could work in humans.

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