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Should We Close Part Of The Ocean To Keep Fish On The Plate?

Tuna, swordfish and other migratory fishes are being overfished by vessels on the high seas. A new proposal says we should close these international waters for a few years to let the fishes rebound.
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Map Of The Developing Human Brain Shows Where Problems Begin

In nine months the human brain grows from a single cell to more than 80 billion. Mapping how genes are activated gives scientists clues to the origins of mental disorders like autism.
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A State Fossil For S. Carolina Faces Mammoth Obstacle

The state senate is wrangling with amendments to insert language inspired by the book of Genesis into a bill to make the Columbian mammoth the state's fossil.
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Ethicists Tell NASA How To Weigh Hazards Of Space Travel

Risks to astronauts on extended missions include vision impairment, weakened bones and radiation exposure. There are also psychological risks from facing danger while being stuck inside a small craft.
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So You Think You're Smarter Than A CIA Agent

When 3,000 average citizens were asked to forecast global events, some consistently made predictions that turned out to be more accurate than those made with classified intelligence.
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Changing The Face Of Astronomy Research

An apprenticeship program in New York City helps lower-income and minority students break into advanced sciences. For one, the love of the stars was motivation to tackle the tough field of astronomy.
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The List Of Animals Who Can Truly, Really Dance Is Very Short. Who's On It?

YouTube is chock full of cats, gophers, dogs and chimps who are supposed to be dancing. But they're not. Biologists say the list of "true" dancers is extremely small. We're on it. But guess who else?
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Fraud Found In Study Claiming Fast, Easy Stem Cells

The lead author of a recent "breakthrough study" fabricated the data and is guilty of scientific misconduct, according to a Japanese research panel. The scientist says she will appeal the judgment.
NPR

Becoming More Popular Doesn't Protect Teens From Bullying

You'd think that the popular kids don't get picked on, but as a teenager's social status rises, they're more apt to be bullied. Increased social combat may be to blame.
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Methane-Producing Microbes Caused 'The Great Dying'

The world's biggest extinction some 250 million years ago wiped out 90 percent of all living things. What caused it has puzzled scientists, and now they think microbes may have done it.

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