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Why We're Happy Being Sad: Pop's Emotional Evolution

Every Top 40 hit in 1965 was in a major key and had a fast tempo. In 2009, more than half of the Top 40 songs were in a minor key. Has there been a shift in the emotional content of music in the past five decades, and why are we drawn to sadness and ambiguity in music?
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As Temps Rise, Cities Combat 'Heat Island' Effect

More than 20,000 high-temperature records have been broken so far this year in the United States. It's especially bad in urban areas, where cities are heating up about twice as fast as the rest of the planet. But a researcher in Atlanta is using the heat wave as an opportunity to do something about the warming planet.
NPR

Can We Learn To Forget Our Memories?

Our capacity to forget is as important, and certainly as interesting, as our ability to remember. But can we train ourselves to suppress certain memories, or the meaning we attach to life events?
NPR

Surveying The Mobile Landscape, Post Patent Battle

Last week, a jury in San Francisco ruled in favor of Apple in a patent battle with Samsung, fining Samsung over a billion dollars for copying parts of Apple's iPhone design and function. Christina Bonnington, who covered the courtroom saga for Wired, describes what the ruling might mean for other phone manufacturers and for consumers.
NPR

Time To Overhaul America's Aging Bridges?

Five years after the deadly collapse of the I-35W bridge in Minneapolis, experts say nearly 8000 of America's bridges are still in dire need of repair--including landmark structures like the Brooklyn Bridge. But how much will it cost? And is there the political will to do it?
NPR

Unwinding The Cucumber Tendril Mystery

How a cucumber creates its curling tendril has stumped scientists for centuries, including Charles Darwin and Asa Gray. With the help of time-lapse photography and prosthetic tendril fabricated in the lab, physicist Sharon Gerbode, biologist Joshua Puzey and colleagues figured out why tendrils twist, according to a new study in Science.
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Meet Your Ancient Relatives: The Denisovans

Reporting in Science, researchers write of sequencing the genome of a young Denisovan girl--an archaic human distantly related to Neanderthals and modern humans. Geneticist David Reich discusses the tale the genome tells about the Denisovan people and their interactions with modern humans.

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