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From Rooftops And Abandoned Lots, An Urban Harvest

From rooftop apiaries in Paris to a vegetable-and-chicken farm in Philadelphia, agriculture has come to the city. Urban farmer Mary Seton Corboy and food writer Jennifer Cockrall-King talk about the future of food in the city. Plus, Tama Matsuoka Wong gives tasty tips for eating garden weeds.
NPR

Trash Can May Be Greenest Option For Unused Drugs

Drug take-back programs are gaining popularity as a safe way to dispose of extra prescriptions. But a study from the University of Michigan suggests that chucking them in your household trash may be just as safe and more environmentally-friendly, thanks to reduced overall pollution.
NPR

NASA, SpaceX Aim To Launch Private Era In Orbit

If all goes well, an unmanned capsule will become the first commercial spacecraft to visit the International Space Station. SpaceX and NASA have been working together to make this launch happen, navigating cultural differences between the young startup and the veteran agency.
NPR

Pennsylvania Doctors Worry Over Fracking 'Gag Rule'

A new law grants doctors access to information about trade-secret chemicals used in natural gas drilling. Doctors say they need the information to treat patients who may have been exposed to chemicals. But the law also says doctors can't tell anyone else — not even other doctors — about what's in the formulas.
NPR

Ancient Deep-Sea Bacteria Are In No Hurry To Eat

Back when the dinosaurs ruled the Earth, some hardy bacteria took up residence at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Eighty six million years later, they're still there. And a new study says they're living out the most Spartan lifestyle known on this planet.
NPR

Bigger, Blander, Blegh: Why Are Strawberries Worse?

Melissa Block talks with Marvin Pritts, a Cornell horticulture professor, about why store-bought strawberries aren't as tasty as the ones you might pick on your own.
NPR

New Brain Sensor Lets Amputees Move Robotic Limbs

Robert Siegel speaks with Dr. Leigh Hochberg, neurologist and engineer at Brown University and the VA Medical Center in Providence, R.I. Hochberg is the lead author of a new study that looks at how paralyzed people are able to move robotic arms with their thoughts, due to a microchip that is implanted in their brains that sends neural signals to a computer.

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