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NPR

The Rebound, The Intersection Of Self-Containing Half Spaces

Did you miss the MIT conference on sports analytics? Slate's Mike Pesca tells NPR's Rachel Martin about the new tracking technology used in basketball, which puts rebounding in whole new light.
NPR

U.S. Grave Science Marked By Risk Aversion And Bureacracy

In part two of a joint investigation by NPR and ProPublica, we look at the agency charged with bringing home and identifying the 83,000 American war dead. It's stymied by an extreme aversion to risk.
NPR

Concerns About Russia Fuel New Calls For Gas Exports

Russia is the world's top natural gas exporter, but the U.S. is the top producer. Jason Bordoff, director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, explains efforts to get American gas to Europe.
NPR

Lawmaker Wants To Ban Orcas At San Diego's SeaWorld

The California Democrat, who was inspired by a controversial documentary, says the killer whales are too large and too intelligent to be confined.
NPR

Second Baby Cleared Of HIV. Rare Event, Or Hope For Others?

A second child seems to have been cleared of the AIDS virus, thanks to heavy-duty drugs started just hours after birth. This spring researchers plan to test that approach in 60 more newborns.
NPR

Almost 500 Foods Contain The 'Yoga Mat' Compound. Should We Care?

A report finds that azodicarbonamide wasn't just in Subway's bread: It's in hundreds of foods. While it has been linked to asthma in factory workers, the additive poses no known risk to consumers.
NPR

Chinese Superstar Lifts Ivory Cause Onto His Shoulders

Former NBA star Yao Ming is very famous in China, and he's using his fame on behalf of conservation issues. Now a member of China's parliament, Yao is calling for a ban on the sale of ivory in China.
NPR

The Scientist Who Makes Stars On Earth

An astrophysicist is using something called the Z machine at Sandia National Lab to recreate the conditions on a white dwarf star — only for a few nanoseconds, but still, enough to study.
NPR

How Yosemite Keeps Its Bears' Paws Off Campers' Hamburgers

The park's bears have developed a taste for humans' food, and that's gotten them in big trouble. But efforts to teach campers to lock up food are helping solve the problem, a bear hair analysis shows.
NPR

Moo-d Music: Do Cows Really Prefer Slow Jams?

Some farmers have long sworn by mellow tunes to boost Bessie's milk production. The science is hardly conclusive. But a study hints at what might top the barnyard playlist. (Psst: They liked R.E.M.)

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