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Followers Embrace Curiosity's Mars Tweets

The Mars rover Curiosity is exploring the surface of the Red Planet in the Gale Crater, and it is also tweeting about its mission. The rover has a distinct personality, albeit one made by the strokes on a keyboard from the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, Calif.
NPR

Why Is The World's Largest Foundation Buying Fake Poop?

The Gates Foundation has granted engineers more than $3 million to develop cheap, high-tech toilets that don't need water or electricity. To test these supercommodes, the foundation has purchased 50 pounds of soybean paste that resembles human waste.
NPR

How A Texas Town Became Water Smart

San Antonio dramatically cut consumption and invested in water recycling and desalination projects. The city still uses about the same amount of water it did in the early '90s even though it has added more than 300,000 residents. It now bills itself as "Water's Most Resourceful City."
NPR

Study: Humans, Elephants User Similar Vocalizations

Audie Cornish talks to Tecumseh Fitch of the University of Vienna in Austria about the science behind elephant communication through sound.
NPR

Paleontologists Unearth Possible Pre-Human Fossils

Fossils discovered in East Africa suggest that Homo erectus, the species believed to be humans' direct ancestor, may have shared Earth with two genetically distinct but similar species. Some paleontologists believe that these species may be distant relatives to modern humans, while others need more evidence.
NPR

Man On The Moon: Saving America's 'One Small Step'

Private space ventures and nations such as China are aiming to potentially leave their own prints in the moon's powdery soil. That's prompted some nervousness about keeping Neil Armstrong's iconic boot print and other artifacts left by U.S. Apollo astronauts safe and secure.
NPR

Neil Armstrong 'Doing Great' After Heart Surgery

That's good news, tweets the second man on the moon — Buzz Aldrin — because he and Armstrong have "agreed to make it [to] the 50th Apollo Anniv in 2019."
NPR

Olympic Bodies: They Just Don't Make Them Like They Used To

We've put together an infographic that explores how athletes' bodies have changed over the last century. Those physiques are shaped by years of training — and by the laws of physics.

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