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Melting The World's Biggest Ice Cube

Antarctica has 90 percent of the world's ice--and it's melting. Ice sheet guru Bob Bindschadler talks about climate change in Antarctica, and rising sea levels across the globe. Plus, biologist Diana Wall talks about hidden life in the barren Dry Valleys, and microbe hunter John Priscu talks about "bugs in the ice."
NPR

Technology Could Give Athletes An Edge At Olympic Park

Engineers say technologies like spray-on clothing and 3D-printed shoes could help future Olympians break records. The Institution of Mechanical Engineers' Philippa Oldham discusses how technology impacts sporting performance and why engineers should work closely with regulators.
NPR

Its Budget Sunk, Undersea Lab May Have To Surface

Florida's Aquarius Reef Base is the only working undersea lab left today. But now that federal funds have dried up, it may be forced to surface. Oceanographer Sylvia Earle joins Science Friday from inside Aquarius, 60 feet underwater, to talk about sponges, corals and other life she's observed on the reef.
NPR

Neuroscientist Turned Crime Solver in "Perception"

"Perception," a new TV show on TNT, stars Eric McCormack as an eccentric neuroscience professor who helps the FBI solve crimes between teaching classes. Series co-creator and executive producer Ken Biller describes the show, and explains how the writers work to get the science right.
NPR

Sniffing Out The Science Behind Sports Doping

How does blood doping boost performance in events like the Tour de France? Do anabolic steroids help the world's fastest man run faster? In his book, Run, Swim, Throw, Cheat , Chris Cooper discusses how these banned drugs work, or don't — and how they are detected.
NPR

Getting High: Physics Of The Fosbury Flop

The world record for high jump — the event in which a person hurdles himself over a horizontal bar — is just over 8 feet. That's like leaping over a stop sign, and clearing it by a foot. Jesus Dapena, of Indiana University, has studied the high jump for 30 years, filming athletes to understand exactly how they produce the force required to clear the bar.
WAMU 88.5

Turning The Tide On HIV And AIDS

New HIV drugs are changing the face of the epidemic, but defeating the virus remains a daunting public health challenge. What it will take to turn the tide on HIV and AIDS with Dr. Anthony Fauci, director at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease.

WAMU 88.5

Remembering Sally Ride

Astronaut and scientist Sally Ride passed away on Monday. We take a look back at her career and consider her legacy.

NPR

How You Move Your Arm Says Something About Who You Are

A part of the brain called the premotor cortex does some pretty complicated work. It's where the brain plans and strategizes about how to take action, and it may also reflect a person's personality.

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