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Cloning, Stem Cells Long Mired In Legislative Gridlock

The news that scientists have successfully cloned a human embryo seems almost certain to rekindle a political fight that has raged, on and off, since the creation of Dolly the sheep. It's a fight that has, over the past decade and a half, produced a lot of heat and light and not a lot of policy.
NPR

NASA Says Kepler's Planet-Searching Days May Be Numbered

The mission launched in 2009 to hunt for Earth-like planets circling distant stars may be coming to an end because of a faulty part in the space telescope.
NPR

Dam Removal Ushers In New Life In Washington State

New life is coming to Washington State's Olympic Peninsula. Two dams along the Elwha River are being removed, bringing a rush of sediment downstream and exposing hundreds of acres of once-submerged land. The dams were built in the early 1900s to power nearby timber mills. But they blocked salmon migration and their power is no longer needed, so they're coming out. This story originated as part of the public media collaboration, EarthFix.
NPR

How Researchers Cloned Human Embryos

After decades of trying, scientists say they've finally figured out how to make personalized embryonic stem cells. One day, these designer cells may help treat an array of diseases. A jolt of caffeine and and a little electric shock helped to do the trick.
NPR

Analyzing The Language Of Suicide Notes To Help Save Lives

About a third of people who attempt suicide leave a note. John Pestian and others at Cincinnati Children's Hospital are merging psychology and computer analysis to see if such notes can help diagnose suicidal tendencies in the living.
NPR

Scientists Clone Human Embryos To Make Stem Cells

The achievement is a long-sought step toward harnessing the potential power of such cells to treat diseases. But the discovery raises ethical concerns because it brings researchers closer to cloning humans.
NPR

Go Fish (Somewhere Else): Warming Oceans Are Altering Catches

Fish are moving away from the equator and toward the poles to maintain their preferred water temperature. That means, for example, that fishermen are seeing swordfish normally found in the Mediterranean swimming near Denmark. But in the tropics, there are no fish to replace the ones that are leaving.
NPR

Road Crew In Belize Destroys Ancient Pyramid

Only a small core of the 2,300-year-old Mayan structure remains after earth-moving equipment destroyed the rest, archaeologists say.

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