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'Electrified Sheep' And Other Odd Experiments

In his new book Electrified Sheep, Alex Boese explores a colorful side of science, filled with bizarre experiments and eccentric scientists, like the surgeon who decided to operate on himself, and Benjamin Franklin, who gave mouth-to-beak resuscitation to a bird.
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How It Feels To Win A Bet Against Stephen Hawking

In a recent interview, world-famous physicist Stephen Hawking revealed that the apparent discovery of the Higgs boson particle cost him $100 in a bet to a fellow physics professor. Guest host David Greene speaks with professor Gordon Kane of the University of Michigan about what it feels like to outsmart arguably the world's smartest man.
NPR

Weekend Special: Guess What? Sweat Is Not Smelly! (So Why Do I Smell?)

If I swipe a little sweat trickling down my leg and hold it to my nose, it smells fine. But if I take a swipe from my arm pit (or several other places I choose not to mention) it's very un-fine. Why the difference?
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NOAA: Just To Be Clear, Mermaids Do Not Exist

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has announced that there is no evidence that mermaids are real, after receiving several queries following the broadcast of an Animal Planet program called, Mermaids: The Body Found. Host Scott Simon explains.
NPR

Blue Whales Drawn Unusually Close To Shore In Calif.

Melissa Block speaks with marine biologist Dorris Welch, who is co-owner of Sanctuary Cruises in Monterey Bay, Calif. She says blue whales come and go throughout the summer, but this year they are coming closer to shore and in bigger numbers. She believes it's because of the abundance of krill available.
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SciFri Book Club Talks Silent Spring

The Science Friday Book Club meets for the first time this week, to talk about Rachel Carson's classic book, Silent Spring. Carson biographer William Souder joins Ira Flatow and Flora Lichtman to discuss Carson's writing style and the book's legacy, 50 years after it was published.
NPR

Peering Into The Dark Side Of Scientific Discovery

What leads a scientist to lie, cheat and falsify findings? In his book, Prize Fight:The Race and the Rivalry to be the First in Science, radiologist Morton Meyers digs up dirt on some major scientific discoveries. He discusses the bitter battles over recognition and reward that often take place behind closed doors.

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