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NPR

Neuroscientists Battle Furiously Over Jennifer Aniston

When researchers showed subjects pictures of Jennifer Aniston, very specific neurons lit up. And these neurons weren't triggered by pictures of other people. This curious finding is one that brain scientists hope to solve by tracing the pathways in the human brain and creating a map called a connectome.
WAMU 88.5

The New World of Massive Data Mining

Private and government groups are finding new ways to mine massive troves of digital data. Tom Gjelten and a panel of experts look at the implications for national security, education, science, medicine, as well as privacy concerns.

NPR

How Much BPA Exposure Is Dangerous?

The FDA has until Saturday to decide whether to ban the plastic additive BPA from food packaging. Some scientists think BPA poses a risk to consumers because it can act like estrogen in the body. But recent studies by government scientists suggest the risk, if any, is minimal.
NPR

Policy On High-Risk Biological Research Tightened

The government released a new policy on how to handle legitimate biological research that could be misused in the wrong hands. The move comes as controversy still swirls around recent experiments with lab-altered bird flu.
NPR

Studies Show Why Insecticides Are Bad News For Bees

Two new studies, published in the prestigious journal Science, suggest that one class of insecticides poses a more serious threat to bees than government regulators realized.
NPR

How Your Brain Is Like Manhattan

The human brain may be just three pounds of jelly. But it turns out that jelly is very organized. New scanning techniques show that the brain's communications pathways are laid out in a highly ordered three-dimensional grid that look a bit like a map of Manhattan.
NPR

Raindrops In Rock: Clues To A Perplexing Paradox

Ancient fossilized raindrops may offer clues to a paradox that's perplexing scientists: the Earth's atmosphere 2.7 billion years ago was similar to the way it is now, even though the sun was younger and dimmer.
NPR

Battling 'Red Tide,' Scientists Map Toxic Algae To Prevent Shellfish Poisoning

Scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are working to prevent outbreaks by tracking when and where red tide in Puget Sound will happen next.

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