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A Tale Of Two Coastlines, Skirted By Swelling Seas

Reports from the National Research Council and the U.S. Geological Survey say that sea levels on both coasts of the United States are rising at an accelerating rate. Oceanographer Peter Howd talks about what's pushing up the oceans, and which coastal hotspots may drown first.
NPR

Bidding Farewell to Lonesome George

Lonesome George, the only living member of a subspecies of giant tortoise, died last weekend at his home in the Galapagos Islands. Linda Cayot, tortoise conservationist and scientific advisor to the Galapagos Conservancy, discusses the life of Lonesome George and how he fit in to the larger picture of biodiversity in the Galapagos.
NPR

Astronauts Prepare For Departure

This Sunday, three members of the International Space Station crew will return to Earth on board a Kazakhstan-bound Soyuz craft, after over six months in orbit. Don Pettit and Andre Kuipers, two of the returning astronauts, and Joe Acaba, who arrived at the station in May, discuss life on board ISS, the visit of the Dragon capsule, and current activities in space.
NPR

How The Taste Of Tomatoes Went Bad (And Kept On Going)

Scientists have discovered that the gene that makes tomatoes uniformly ripe and red also makes them less tasty. But it's going to take consumer education and a willingness to pay more before the industry makes a change.
NPR

Unlike Chicken And Pork, Beef Still Begins With Small Family Ranches

The beef industry is shaped like a bottle: It starts at the bottom with 750,000 small ranches and ends with just four meatpacking plants processing about 82 percent of the beef we eat.
NPR

A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

Americans eat more meat than almost anyone else in the world, but habits are starting to change. This may be in part because of health and environmental concerns. We explore some of the meat trends and changes in graphs and charts.
NPR

Brain Science Behind Youth Life Sentence Ruling

Life sentences for juveniles who commit murder are now considered cruel and unusual punishment, according to a new Supreme Court decision. Host Michel Martin discusses the closely divided ruling with George Washington University law professor Paul Butler. He's the author of Let's Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice.
NPR

Twin Probes to Investigate Space Weather Mysteries

When solar storms strike, radio signals jam, power grids go down, GPS systems fail. Two new satellites may soon help NASA scientists understand the effects of space weather down here on Earth. The probes, two years in the making, will finally be launched on Aug. 23.

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