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Neanderthals: The Oldest Cave Painters?

Reporting in Science, researchers write that a red disk painted in Spain's El Castillo cave is at least 40,800 years old--making it the oldest known European cave art. Archaeologist Alistair Pike discusses how his team dated the disk, and whether Neanderthals could have painted it.
NPR

Putting a Friendly Face on Statistics

A better way to represent data could turn numbers into features. Marc Abrahams, editor of the Annals of Improbable Research, talks about why people are better at recognizing faces than staring at statistics, and if merging the two could make data accessible to everyone.
NPR

Famous Cave Paintings Might Not Be From Humans

The eerie stencil paintings of human hands in Spanish caves might not be from humans at all. New dating methods of the paintings suggest some of the cave art is more than 40,000 years old and could have been drawn by Neanderthals.
NPR

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Investigates The Space Science Of Summer Movies

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson keeps a close eye on science in the movies — he even got a change made to Titanic. Here, he talks about truths and less-than-truths in some of the films that are taking us outside our own realm.
NPR

Mozambique Farmland Is Prize In Land Grab Fever

Villagers say they're getting a raw deal as companies rush to buy up African land to form mega-farms. Farmers complain they've been ousted from the land while promises to improve water systems and schools and replant uprooted crops are not being kept.
NPR

Scientists Tackle The Geography Of Nature Vs. Nurture In Maps Of U.K.

Genes and the environment both shape health and development. But their effects are not always equal. Researchers in the U.K. say they've mapped hotspots where nature has a stronger influence, and others where nurture dominates.
NPR

Tracking Asteroids From A Backyard In Kansas

Earth has been struck by asteroids many times. It will happen again. The question is how soon, and whether the asteroid will be large enough to cause significant damage. A Kansas man is helping to track asteroids with the potential to become a threat, and he does it from his own backyard — with a telescope he made himself. Machinist by day, amateur astronomer by night, Gary Hug is making a name for himself as one of the most prolific asteroid-trackers in the world.
NPR

Blinded By The Light, Birds Crash Into Radio Towers

Audie Cornish talks to Travis Longcore, associate professor of spatial sciences at the University of Southern California, about bird collisions with communication towers. Longcore co-authored a study that found 6.8 million birds die each year in the U.S. because they fly into communication towers.

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