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Olympic Torch On Its Way To International Space Station

The Olympic torch was launched into space on Wednesday night. It will accompany astronauts on a spacewalk before returning to Earth on Nov. 10.
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Why Do People Agree To Work In Boring Jobs?

In the essay "The Myth of Sisyphus," philosopher Albert Camus — who would have turned 100 on Thursday — explored the nature of boring work. There's new psychological research into why people end up in boring jobs.
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To Understand A Russian Fireball, Physicists Turn To YouTube

Hundreds of videos captured the flight of a fiery meteor over the city of Chelyabinsk in central Russia last winter. Now scientists have used those videos to help calculate the force of the blast and to triangulate the meteor's path.
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Olympic Torch Relay Headed To Space

The Olympic torch was launched into space on Wednesday night. It will accompany astronauts on a spacewalk before returning to Earth on Nov. 10.
NPR

4-D Printing Means Building Things That Build Themselves

You've heard of 3-D printing — now add one more dimension. Researchers are figuring out how to create structures that move and respond to their environment after they're printed.
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Another Election?! Relax, This One's To Name A Baby Panda

The Smithsonian's National Zoo has proposed five possible names for the female cub born this summer. Voting is already underway.
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Forget Barley And Hops: Craft Brewers Want A Taste Of Place

Craft brewers around the country are making beers with foraged seeds, roots, fruits and fungi from their backyards and backwoods. It's a challenge to the placelessness of mainstream brewers, who mostly use the same ingredients grown in the same places — barley from the Great Plains and hops from the Pacific Northwest.
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How Pictures Of Infant Boy's Eyes Helped Diagnose Cancer

A research chemist applied his analytical smarts to his son's eye cancer. By analyzing family photos starting with some taken just a few days after birth, the dad found that signs of retinoblastoma, a rare eye cancer, could be detected quite early.
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Thanks To Parasites, Moose Are Looking More Like Ghosts

Parts of the U.S. and Canada have seen a rapid decline in moose populations that may be linked to climate change. And, scientists and hunters warn, those declines have often been accompanied by a surge of infestations of the winter tick.
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Study Says 40 Billion Planets In Our Galaxy Could Support Life

A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that roughly 1 in 5 stars, like our own sun, have an Earth-like planet orbiting around it. That's about 40 billion planets that could support life in the Milky Way galaxy. Melissa Block talks to co-author Geoff Marcy, an astronomy professor at the University of California-Berkeley, about the latest numbers.

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