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Vultures Beware: Virginia Town Targets Flock Of Unwanted Visitors

In the town of Leesburg, Va., a flock of 200 turkey vultures takes over suburban backyards every few years. Despite their seeming abundance, the birds are protected by federal law, so the residents called in backup for some official vulture harassment.
NPR

Automakers Drive Towards Hydrogen Cars

Toyota and BMW have formed an alliance to work on fuel cell cars. So have Daimler, Ford, and Nissan, with hopes of having cars on the road by 2017. But why now, and what obstacles still stand in the way? Jennifer Kurtz discusses the current state of hydrogen fuel technology.
NPR

Science of Slumber: How Sleep Affects Your Memory

We spend a lot of time sleeping (roughly one-third of our lives, according to the National Institutes of Health). But how much downtime do our brains really need? Experts discuss the links between sleep, memory and cognition, and why our sleep patterns change as we age.
NPR

Researchers Point To The Demise of the Dinosaurs

The idea that a comet or asteroid impact led to the downfall of the dinosaurs has been around for years. Now, Paul Renne and colleagues report in Science that they've narrowed down the timing of that collision. It's practically simultaneous with dinosaur extinction.
NPR

Tracking Privacy and Ownership In An On-Line World

Your phone knows where you are. Social networks know who your friends are, and what you ate last night. How much of your personal data is really yours to control? Khaliah Barnes of the Electronic Privacy Information Center helps sort out the politics and policies of privacy.
NPR

Astronaut And Rocker Pen First Earth-Space Duet

Talk about the ultimate space jam. The song is called "I.S.S. (Is Somebody Singing)," and it's a very long-distance collaboration between Canadians Ed Robertson of Barenaked Ladies and Chris Hadfield, who currently commands the International Space Station. The song premiered Friday.
NPR

Close Shave: Asteroid To Buzz Earth Next Week

At its closest approach, the office building-sized asteroid will be only about 17,200 miles above the surface of our planet. That's far nearer to us than the moon, and even closer than some weather and communications satellites. Some people think this near miss should serve as a wake-up call.

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