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Medical Electronics Built To Last Only A Little While

Using silicon, magnesium and a special type of silk, scientists have created electronic circuits that dissolve in liquid. Electronics like these could be useful in future implantable medical devices.
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Metal Cylinder Holding Weight Of The World Mysteriously Changes

The world depends on one chunk of metal for measuring the mass of everything on earth. We check out a copy of that official kilogram in Gaithersburg, and explore why the cylinder's mass is mysteriously changing.

NPR

Big Quakes Signal Changes Coming To Earth's Crust

A huge, magnitude-8.7 earthquake in April produced stronger ground shaking than any earthquake ever recorded, and surprised seismologists by triggering more than a dozen moderate earthquakes around the world. One seismologist thinks we're witnessing the gradual evolution of a new boundary between tectonic plates.
NPR

New Groups Make A Conservative Argument On Climate Change

Two new Republican groups are bucking their party's widespread rejection of climate science. They're targeting young people, warning of the national security risks of fossil fuel dependence, and touting free market ideas to deal with global warming.
NPR

CEOs May Find It Lonely At The Top, But Not Stressful

It's lonely at the top — and we often assume it's stressful too. Golf outings and retreats are designed to help executives unwind, but it turns out their underlings may be far more stressed out. A new study has found that as leadership rank increases, stress levels decline. Melissa Block speaks with Jennifer Lerner of Harvard University, the study's lead author.
NPR

Scientists Go Deep On Genes Of SARS-Like Virus

Scientists have partially decoded the genetic sequence of a new virus, which has killed one man and hospitalized another. Advances in sequencing technologies have helped health workers rapidly respond to the virus in ways that they couldn't during the SARS epidemic of 2002.
NPR

Mammalian Surprise: African Mouse Can Regrow Skin

Scientists have discovered that a mouse found in Africa can lose large patches of skin and then grow it back without scarring, perhaps as a way of escaping the clutches of a predator. It's a finding that challenges the conventional view that mammals have an extremely limited ability to replace injured body parts.
NPR

If Genetically Modified Apples Don't Brown, Can You Tell If They're Rotten?

Genetically modified apples that don't go brown could become the first transgenic apple varieties approved for sale in the U.S. Scientists say they're safe to eat, but the real question is, will consumers buy them?

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