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NPR

Found In Musical Translation: Higgs Boson Explained

Finding the Higgs boson was an important discovery. But for all of the publicity the particle has received, how many could explain what it does? Host Scott Simon talks with the researchers who have turned the recently discovered Higgs boson into music.
NPR

What's Killing 'King Coal' In West Virginia?

For decades, coal represented half of the nation's electricity generation, but it dropped to only 34 percent for the month of March. While the decline is partially due to a warmer winter and stricter environmental regulations, the real culprit may be natural gas. Technological breakthroughs in fracking have led to a gas boom that's caused prices to plummet. As a result, power plants are switching from coal to natural gas and mines in Appalachia are shutting down.
NPR

Myths And Tips On Keeping Your Cool This Summer

As you sweat during hot-weather exercise, the body's temperature inches up, and heatstroke can result. Douglas Casa, of the Korey Stringer Institute, explains the best way to stay safely hydrated during summer activity--and why too much water can be a bad thing too.
NPR

Look, Listen, Taste

Is there more to tasting than meets your tongue? Researchers are investigating how the way food smells, or looks, can change the way it's perceived. Can eating something in a blue bowl make it seem saltier? Marc Abrahams, editor of theAnnals of Improbable Research, describes the research, and shares some food industry "insider" tips for making food taste better.
NPR

Climate Change Ups Odds Of Heat Waves, Drought

Reporting in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, researchers write that extreme heat waves, such as the one last year in Texas, are 20 times more likely today than they were in the 1960s. NOAA climatologist Tom Peterson discusses what future climate change may bring.
NPR

What Happens When Scientists Get It Wrong?

Reporting in Science, two teams of scientists say they were unable to replicate the results of a 2010 study claiming to have found 'alien life' on Earth--a bacterium that could build its DNA using arsenic. Science journalist Carl Zimmer talks about how the controversy played out online, and how science corrects itself.
NPR

The Nuts And Bolts Of High-Speed Rail

California lawmakers gave the green light to the first phase of construction of high-speed rail in the state. Does this mean that America is on track for faster, sleeker trains? What potential speed bumps still lie ahead? Railroad engineer Christopher Barkan discusses the costs, benefits and state of the technology.

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