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Can Science Plant Brain Seeds That Make You Vote?

Politics has been a profession ruled by gut instinct, gurus and polls. But over the past 15 years, the primary method of scientific advance — the randomized controlled study — has been wheedling its way into politics. Bit by bit, it's challenging a lot of the conventional wisdom that dominates current political campaigns.
NPR

Plugging In For A Better Night's Sleep

High-tech gadgets, like smartphones, keep us connected at all hours and are making it more difficult to get a good night's sleep. But several new smartphone apps claim to help users sleep better. New York Times health and fitness reporter Anahad O'Connor explains the science behind apps.
WAMU 88.5

Philip Houston and Michael Floyd: "Spy the Lie"

Two former CIA agents explain how the techniques they used to catch terrorists and spies can be applied in our daily lives. How to spot a lie and get people to tell you the truth.

NPR

FDA Monitors Scientists' Critical Emails

The Food and Drug Administration has been secretly monitoring the emails of its scientists, who had expressed criticism of the agency's review process for approving medical devices. The New York Times reported the FDA captured thousands of private communications involving the scientists and members of Congress, their lawyers and even President Obama. Steve Inskeep talks with Times reporter Scott Shane, who co-reported the story.
NPR

From Coal To Gas: The Potential Risks And Rewards

A new report links some extreme weather events to climate change, but greenhouse gas emissions have been declining in recent years. In part, the decrease might be attributed to the change from coal to natural gas for energy production, but that too has its critics, and draws concerns over potential environmental impact.
NPR

The Id, The Ego And The Superhero: What Makes Batman Tick?

Sure, Bruce Wayne is a secretive guy, but from a psychological perspective, is anything really wrong with him? A psychologist considers this question.
NPR

Starry-Eyed In Arizona Observe The Heavens

Tucscon, Ariz., is probably the best urban area in the country for viewing the stars. Tucson's clear, cloudless skies attract all sorts of astronomy buffs, professional and amateur. NPR's Peter Breslow takes a look at the astronomy culture of the region.

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